Posts Tagged ‘School’

Another Shocking School Fight Video Emerges (Video)

May 25, 2013

brawl

 

Who would want to be a high school teacher in this place?

 

 

Click on the link to read Tips for Parents of Bullied Children

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Click on the link to read Sickening Video of Girl Being Bullied for Having Ginger Hair

Is There a Greater Tragedy than a School Tragedy?

May 21, 2013

tornado

My thoughts and wishes go out to all those effected by the recent Oklahoma tornado.

US President Barack Obama declared a “major disaster” as rescuers combed through smashed homes and the collapsed remains of an elementary school in Moore, where twister-seasoned residents were shocked by the devastation.

The dead included at least 20 children, most of them under the age of 12, Amy Elliott, of the state medical examiner’s office, told AFP.

Reporters for local broadcaster KFOR-TV saw children as young as nine being pulled out of the Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, a residential community of 55,000 just south of Oklahoma’s state capital.

Anxious parents were being kept at a distance while search-and-rescue workers scrambled to free the students.

A second elementary school, Briarwood, was also hit but did not appear to have suffered casualties.

tornado2

Click on the link to read Advice for Talking With Your Kids About the Boston Marathon Attack

Click on the link to read 6 Messages For Children After a Tragedy

Click on the link to read A Teacher’s Guide to Talking to Students About the Newtown School Shooting

Click on the link to read Explaining the Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting to Children

Click on the link to read Helping Kids Cope in the Aftermath of Sandy

Click here to read ‘Helping Our Children Make Sense of Natural Disasters’.

19 US States Still Allow Corporal Punishment in their Classrooms

April 7, 2013

map

It is quite upsetting that 19 US States still allow corporal punishment in their schools. Below are some damning statistics taken from 2005-2006. I hope the numbers of students hit per state has dramatically lessened since then, but I somewhat doubt it. Of equal concern is the ratio of black and Hispanic children being metered out this outdated and inhumane form of punishment.

State
Number of Students Hit
Number of IDEA Students Hit
Total Number of Students Hit
Percentage of Total Students
Alabama
33,716
381
34,097
4.6
Arkansas
22,314
261
22,575
4.7
Arizona
16
0
16
<0.0
Colorado
8
0
8
<0.0
Florida
7,185
118
7,303
.3
Georgia
18,249
155
18,404
1.1
Idaho
111
20
131
.05
Indiana
577
36
613
.05
Kansas
50
4
54
.01
Kentucky
2,209
1
2.210
.3
Louisiana
11,080
11
11,091
1.7
Missouri
5,159
35
5,194
.6
Mississippi
38,131
83
38,214
7.5
North Carolina
2,705
31
2,736
.2
New Mexico
705
44
749
.2
Ohio
672
0
672
.04
Oklahoma
14,828
325
15,153
2.4
South Carolina
1,409
12
1,421
.2
Tennessee
14,868
33
14,901
1.5
Texas
49,197
1,973
51,170
1.1
Wyoming
0
0
0
0

Not Another School Shooting! (Video)

January 11, 2013

C’mon already! In the wake of the recent school shooting in Connecticut all schools were on high alert. The fact that even in this increasingly aware state yet another school shooting could take place is reason enough to go beyond talks of armed guards, gun trained teachers and metal detectors. America needs strict gun laws!

US vice-president Joe Biden and the National Rifle Association (NRA) butted heads on gun control in Washington as one person was injured in another US school shooting.

Police say a 16-year-old student was shot and wounded by a fellow classmate who opened fire with a shotgun at a high school in rural California.

The shooting took place at Taft Union High School in the town of Taft north of Los Angeles, just weeks after the massacre of 26 people – including 20 children – at a school in Newtown, Connecticut.

The violence has revived America’s debate about gun control, and just before news of the shooting broke Mr Biden sat down for a private meeting with NRA representatives.

Mr Biden is heading a task force exploring ways to reduce gun violence and plans to submit recommendations to president Barack Obama by next Tuesday.

Hopes the meeting would lead to a breakthrough were dashed when the NRA released a statement saying it was disappointed that the meeting had little to do with keeping children safe and more to do with attacking gun rights.

“It is unfortunate that this administration continues to insist on pushing failed solutions to our nation’s most pressing problems. We will not allow law-abiding gun owners to be blamed for the acts of criminals and madmen,” the statement said.

The NRA says it will now reach out to members of Congress for what it calls an honest conversation about what will and will not reduce gun violence.

Click on the link to read Do You Really Want to Arm Me?

Click on the link to read Living With Adam Lanza

Click on the link to read School Shooting Showcases the Heroic Nature of Brilliant Teachers

Click on the link to read Let’s Make Sure that this School Shooting is the Last

Click on the link to read Get Rid of Your Guns!

Click on the link to read Explaining the Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting to Children

Do You Really Want to Arm Me?

December 19, 2012

arm

Never take a suggestion from a gun advocate seriously.

What’s a person calling themselves a ‘gun advocate’ anyway? Out of every single thing in the world that you can use to represent who you are and what your world view is, who in their right mind would choose to align themselves with deadly weapons?

“I was thinking of becoming a charity worker or humanitarian but I decided to aim higher and lobby for the freedom to store deadly weapons in my attic.”

Anyway, back to their insane suggestion of the month – arming teachers to combat deadly, insane gunmen at schools.

Who do they think we are? Bruce Willis!

Why do you think we need to justify the proliferation of deadly weapons by arming good people with more weapons? Thank Heavens I’m an Australian because I want rulers and pencils and ‘Good Effort’ stickers in my top drawer – not a pistol!

In the terrible event of a situation like the one we saw at Sandy Hook Primary School, I would do everything in my powers to protect my students – including taking bullets for them. But let’s face it – I’m no action hero. A teaching degree shouldn’t depend on a high score at the shooting range and the ability to put together a rifle blindfolded. Teachers have enough to worry about in their classroom -gun handling should not be included in the mix. It should be about classroom management not firearm management.

And don’t give me that rubbish about ‘guns are like cars, it’s the people that use them that can cause harm’. The purpose of a car is to take you from point A to point B, the purpose of a gun is to kill another living being. And don’t start with the expression ‘misuse’ a gun. Adam Lanza did not ‘misuse’ his gun. He used his gun for it’s direct purpose.

To gun lobbyists and advocates, I have this message for you. You have an opportunity right now to make an important mind shift. You can stand firm and watch your beloved weapons being used to kill innocent school children and moviegoers or you can use your passion and boundless energy to advocate for other causes such as child welfare.

If I wanted to be a cop I would have signed up for the Academy. But I am not policeman material. Instead, I signed up to help students feel safe, cared for, nurtured and educated.

The only tools I want in my holster are whiteboard markers and grey lead pencils.

Click on the link to read Living With Adam Lanza

Click on the link to read School Shooting Showcases the Heroic Nature of Brilliant Teachers

Click on the link to read Let’s Make Sure that this School Shooting is the Last

Click on the link to read Get Rid of Your Guns!

Click on the link to read Explaining the Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting to Children

Get Rid of Your Guns!

December 15, 2012

dawn

One of the best policies that Australia has ever implemented was a gun buy-back scheme. Although illegal from owning a firearm, the Government recognised after a tragic massacre at Port Arthur that guns were available and something had to be done about it. So they bought people’s guns and incinerated them. You would think that the people who owned these guns would have happily kept quiet about it, and I’m sure many did, but the hand-in rate was overwhelming.

Whilst I realise that the United States has a very different outlook on guns than we do, I must say that if there is an amendment in their constitution that I’m unhappy with it’s the “right to bear arms” one. Whilst I wish this amendment could be tossed away for good, I realise that the US population would never accept such a drastic change.

But that doesn’t mean you have to own a gun. That doesn’t mean that you have to expose your children to guns. I know that guns don’t kill people but no angry, potential gunmen is going to take siege of a school with a baseball bat.

Whilst guns are readily accessible, I’m afraid security measures are unlikely to be sufficient in warding off gunmen:

Dawn Hochsprung, the principal of Sandy Hook Elementary who died in the shootings at the Newtown, Conn., school Dec. 14, had recently implemented new security measures, CNN reports.

In a letter to parents this fall, Hochsprung outlined new security procedures, which included checking identification for visitors if they were not recognized by staff.

“Please understand that with nearly 700 students and over 1,000 parents representing 500… families, most parents will be asked to show identification,” Hochsprung wrote in the letter, which was addressed to “Members of our Sandy Hook Family.”

The letter also stated that all visitors arriving at the school after 9:30 a.m., when the front gates were locked, would have to ring a bell for entry and would immediately have to report to the main office to sign in.

The Associated Press reported that the shooter’s mother was a teacher at the school.

Twenty-six victims died in the shooting, including 20 children and six staff members. The gunman appears to have taken his own life.

Hochsprung, a veteran administrator with 12 years of experience, kept an active Twitter account and was a respected member of the education community.

“Dawn Hochsprung… touched many of our hearts with her professionalism and love for her students,” Bethlehem, Conn., first selectman Jeff Hamel said in a statement Friday afternoon, according to the Litchfield County Times. “Our hearts and prayers go out to all the victims from this selfish, senseless act.”

WNYT reported that Hochsprung was a doctoral student at the Sage Colleges, having started a education leadership program over the summer.

Lori Quigley, dean of the college, told the station that Hochsprung was “vibrant, full of life and loved her school community” and called her a “truly… caring administrator.”

A candlelight vigil for the victims of the shooting was scheduled in Woodbury, Conn., Friday night.

Click on the link to read Helping Kids Cope in the Aftermath of Sandy

Click here to read ‘Helping Our Children Make Sense of Natural Disasters’.

20 Questions Teachers Should Be Asking Themselves

December 10, 2012

teaching

Courtesy of minds-in-bloom.com:

    1. What are some things you accomplished this year that you are proud of?
    2. What is something you tried in your classroom this year for the first time? How did it go?
    3. What is something you found particularly frustrating this year?
    4. Which student in your class do you think showed the most improvement? Why do you think this student did so well?
    5. What is something you would change about this year if you could?
    6. What is one way that you grew professionally this year?
    7. Who amongst your colleagues was the most helpful to you?
    8. What has caused you the most stress this year?
    9. When was a time this year when you felt joyful and/or inspired about the work that you do?
    10. What do you hope your students remember most about you as a teacher?
    11. In what ways were you helpful to your colleagues this year?
    12. What was the most valuable thing you learned this year?
    13. What was the biggest mistake you made this year? How can you avoid making the same mistake in the future?
    14. What is something you did this year that went better than you thought it would?
    15. What part of the school day is your favorite? Why?
    16. What were your biggest organizational challenges this year?
    17. Who was your most challenging student? Why?
    18. In what ways did you change the lives of your students this year?
    19. Pretend that you get to set your own salary for this past year based on the job that you did. How much do you feel that you earned (the number you come up with should be in no way based on your current salary – rather, come up with a number that truly reflects how you should be compensated for your work this year)?
    20. Knowing what you know now, would you still choose to be a teacher if you could go back in time and make the choice again? If the answer is “no,”  is there a way for you to choose a different path now?

Click on the link to read School Official Allegedly told a Teacher to Train her Breasts to not Make Milk at Work

Click on the link to read 12 Tips for Managing Time in the Classroom

Click on the link to read If Teachers Were Paid More I Wouldn’t Have Become One

Click on the link to read Different Professions, Same Experiences

Click on the link to read Our Pay Isn’t the Problem

Students are Continually Treated Like Prisoners

November 29, 2012

One of my biggest goals since entering teaching was that my students appreciate my classes enough to actually want to attend them.

My dream is to have my students wake up on a school morning and say:

“Hey, I’ve got school today, and that’s OK”.

Fundamentally, it is the job of the educator to teach well enough to engage their students. We have to do better than forcing our children to attend school, we have got to find a way to make them feel comfortable with going out of their own volition.

Fitting GPS tracking devices to their IDs is sending the message that our system has given up trying. It has decided that it hasn’t got the time, energy or creativity to make school palatable, so it has no choice but to make prisoners out of the school population.

Students will therefore be getting the following message:

1. School is tedious;

2. The school administration think of us like prisoners;

3. The school administration don’t trust us;

4. We ate just a number. Just a blip on a computer screen. We are not unique, special or important. Just a sheep being watched over by a duty bound shepard.

To 15-year-old Andrea Hernandez, the tracking microchip embedded in her student ID card is a “mark of the beast,” sacrilege to her Christian faith – not to mention how it pinpoints her location, even in the school bathroom.

But to her budget-reeling San Antonio school district, those chips carry a potential $1.7 million in classroom funds.

Starting this fall, the fourth-largest school district in Texas is experimenting with “locator” chips in student ID badges on two of its campuses, allowing administrators to track the whereabouts of 4,200 students with GPS-like precision. Hernandez’s refusal to participate isn’t a twist on teenage rebellion, but has launched a debate over privacy and religion that has forged a rare like-mindedness between typically opposing groups.

Click on the link to read What’s Next? A No Breathing Rule?

Click on the link to read Never Mistake Compassion with the Threat of a Lawsuit

Click on the link to read How About Punishing the Students Who do Something Wrong?

Click on the link to read Potty Training at a Restaurant Table!

Click on the link to read Mother Shaves Numbers Into Quadruplets Heads So People Can Tell Them Apart

The 15 Most Commonly Misspelled Words in the English Language

July 2, 2012

 

Below is a list of everyday words that people struggle to spell correctly:

1: Their–confusion may come from “thief”.

2: A lot–”alot” isn’t a word.

3: Received–there’s that “I” and “E” again.

4: Separate–confusion is probably caused by the pronunciation.

5: Until–one “L”: “Till the earth until it’s ready.”

6: Because–”A” and “U” are commonly swapped.

7: Beginning–two “Ns”.

8: Different–spoken, the first “E” isn’t enunciated, so it’s often left out.

9: Occurred–two “Cs”, two “Rs”.

10: Believe–it actually follows the old rule.

11: Behavior–no “U” for American spelling.

12: Which–don’t forget that first “H”.

13: Truly–”true” loses its “E” when adding “ly”, but–

14: Really–”real” gains an “L”.

15: Definitely–an “A” often sneaks in.

 

 

The Punishment That Used to Work but No Longer Does

June 18, 2012

When I was a child there was no punishment more feared than a suspension from school.  The idea that the Principal could at any moment call your parents to pick you up and take you home was enough to make any child think before breaking a rule. But times have changed and suspensions have lost their effectiveness. This is partly due to it being metered out for minor offenses such as answering back and rudeness and partly due to a change in parenting styles.

If my parents were given the call to pick me up early they would have been furious. They would have immediately sided with the school and grounded me at home. Nowadays, parents take their children’s side and embrace them rather than berate them. When the child returns to school after their suspension, it is common to hear them boast about being taken out for a coffee and spending the afternoon playing video games.

It is no wonder that a recent survey has labelled suspensions as ‘counterproductive’:

SUSPENDING students from school for bad behaviour is counterproductive, with students who have been suspended twice as likely to be excluded again in the next 12 months.

Research by Australian Catholic University professor Sheryl Hemphill found about 6 per cent of students in Years 6-8 have been suspended, rising to 12 per cent of Year 10 students.

“Kids who are suspended just keep getting suspended. It doesn’t stop the behaviour that resulted in the suspension, it almost sets them on a pathway more likely to lead to suspension,” she said. “The risk for students who are having trouble maintaining engagement and staying at school is that suspension starts to help them move out of school.”

As part of a series of reports on problems in our nation’s schools, The Australian has found that suspended students were 50 per cent more likely to engage in antisocial behaviour and 70 per cent more likely to commit a violent act in the next 12 months.

Professor Hemphill said the policy of excluding students from school as punishment for bad behaviour sent a mixed message: every child must attend school, except on some occasions.

“It’s so contradictory to everything else we’re trying to do,” she said. “We’re trying to keep kids in school longer, we know the positive benefits of keeping them connected to further study and training for employment.

“Suspension doesn’t fit with the current policy environment, a lot of which promotes connection with education, because suspension is potentially a way of cutting off students.”

The problem with scrapping suspensions is that it leaves teachers with fewer options in dealing with class discipline issues.

Click here to read about my post on teachers being stripped of the ability to give punishments that work.


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