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Archive for the ‘Child Welfare’ Category

Teachers Who Agree With This Guy Should Be De-Registered

January 30, 2017

gavel

Agree with this guy? You don’t belong in a classroom!

 

A MALE teacher of disabled students, who has been charged with accessing child pornography on the internet, has claimed he should be able to teach again, because no children were harmed.

The Queensland teacher was putting forward an argument to get his registration suspension lifted, so he could teach again before the three charges are heard in court.

He is facing charges of possessing child exploitation material and using a carriage service to access and transmit child pornography.

Queensland College of Teachers suspended the teacher’s registration on December 16 last year, after he was charged.

In his submission to Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, the teacher, who cannot be named, did not submit the charges were unfounded.

Instead, he argued the charges were only internet-related, and there was no suggestion any child under his care had been harmed.

 

Click on the link to read The Staggering Amount of Teacher Reported Child Abuse Cases

Click on the link to read Hungry Kids are Almost Unteachable

Click on the link to read School Rewards Good Grades With an Earlier Lunch

Click on the link to read What Kids are Thankful For (Video)

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The Staggering Amount of Teacher Reported Child Abuse Cases

January 19, 2017

child-abuse

This is an indication that our teachers are vigilant, that they fundamentally care about their students and that they are really well educated about the signs of possible child abuse:

 

SCHOOL teachers are increasingly becoming child ­protection watchdogs with soaring numbers of abuse reports being made to authorities.

New figures reveal 5244 reports made by school staff were investigated by authorities in 2015-16, up from 4599 the previous year.

The data, due to be released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in the coming months, underlines the rising responsibilities of teachers.

Principals say an increased focus on domestic violence, and the inquiry into institutional child sex abuse could be driving the higher number of reports. Victorian Principals Association president Anne-Maree Kliman called for the reporting process to be streamlined, with some teachers stuck on the phone to authorities for up to an hour and other reports not immediately followed up.

“The time delay is a bother and I wonder how many calls got missed because of that,” Ms Kliman said.

“Sometimes we also get push-back from the (Health and Human Services) department asking what we think they should be doing.

“It’s not our job to be making those decisions.”

A Respectful Relationships program, aimed at tackling domestic violence, will be rolled out in schools this year.

It will include showing younger students pictures of both boys and girls doing the dishes and kicking the footy in an attempt to smash gender stereotypes, “gender literacy” and warnings about pornography for older students.

Judy Crowe, from the Victorian Association of State Secondary Principals, said decades of training teachers had created a culture of reporting abuse.

“Reporting abuse is so important that it transcends concern about teachers being expected to do things that put extra work on them,” she said. “Government schools have a reasonably good record in this arena.”

The Australian Education Union’s Victorian president, Meredith Peace, said schools needed long-term state and federal funding to help the “most vulnerable” students.

The State Government last year spent $51 million on about 640 student support staff, including half who were psychologists and one in five who were social workers.

An Education Department spokesman said new standards ensured schools were “well prepared to protect children from abuse and neglect”.

 

Click on the link to read Hungry Kids are Almost Unteachable

Click on the link to read School Rewards Good Grades With an Earlier Lunch

Click on the link to read What Kids are Thankful For (Video)

Click on the link to read Our Students Show us Up All the Time!

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

Hungry Kids are Almost Unteachable

December 30, 2015

hungry-students

Try and learn a new or difficult concept on an empty stomach. It’s virtually impossible to be anywhere near your best when you’re hungry:

 

An increasing number of pupils in Scotland are going to school hungry and in some cases are stealing food from classmates, according to teachers.

Teaching union the EIS carried out a survey as part of its work on tackling the impact of poverty in schools.

About half (51%) of those questioned reported a rise in pupils coming to school without any food.

The survey also found an increase in those taking free school meals and attending breakfast clubs.

More than 300 primary and secondary teachers responded to the autumn survey by the country’s largest teaching union.

One in five (19%) identified an increase in the number of incidents of children asking for food and even stealing food from other pupils.

 

Click on the link to read School Rewards Good Grades With an Earlier Lunch

Click on the link to read What Kids are Thankful For (Video)

Click on the link to read Our Students Show us Up All the Time!

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

Would You Want Jeremy Forrest Teaching Your Child?

May 25, 2015

 

TIM STEWART NEWS LIMITED 07932745508: Married maths teacher Jeremy Forrest, of Ringmer near Lewes, who has run away to France with pupil Megan Stammers, 15, of Eastbourne, East Sussex.

 

Some championed the incarcerated Forrest as a victim of consensual love between a teacher and his teenage student. I ask those supporters, now that his intention to continue teaching abroad has come to light, would you want him teaching your child?:

 

Paedophile Jeremy Forrest is planning to move to Thailand where he hopes to take back up work as a teacher, it has been claimed.

The 32-year-old was jailed in 2013 after running away to France with a 15-year-old schoolgirl, sparking an international manhunt.

After serving two years of his five-and-a-half year sentence, the paedophile from Lewes, Sussex, could be released later this summer.

Click on the link to read Tips for Tackling the Mental Health Stigma in Your Classroom

Click on the link to read A Lack of Proper Sleep Does a World of Damage to a Child’s Attention Span

Click on the link to read What an ISIS School Looks Like

Click on the link to read Using Children as Bait is Abhorrent

Tips for Tackling the Mental Health Stigma in Your Classroom

December 3, 2014

depression

I must admit that I have never been formally trained on how to teach a child suffering from mental health issues or even how to bring the topic up in the classroom.

Whilst these tips by Martin Williams are all within the realms of common sense, it is good to get the reassurance that you can deal with something effectively even if you were never trained to do so:

 

Talk about mental health

“Mental health was never mentioned at school at all,” says Charlotte Walker, who now writes a blog on mental health issues. “I found out I had depression aged 12 from a teenage health guide.”

Now a mother, Walker is acutely aware that there is still a worrying lack of discussion about mental health in schools. It’s a problem that can not only lead to stigmatisation, but also cause health issues to go undiagnosed. “My son’s experience is that schools focus on the ‘safer’ feeling topics, such as insomnia and exam stress, but don’t dare go into the realms of bipolar or schizophrenia.”

Walker suggests that teachers should tackle the problem by simply trying to be more candid about mental health when chatting to children. “We’ve seen that sex and relationship education doesn’t always work because it’s in dedicated sessions,” she explains. “I think it’s important to have a general spirit of openness.”

It’s also important to talk openly about what support is in place for children who are experiencing difficulties, she says. “It tends to be that you only find out what’s on offer once you’ve declared your child is having problems,” Walker says. “If the information is given out to everyone, no one is singled out for stigma or discrimination.”

But tackle derogatory language

While it’s important to encourage discussion of mental health, research has shown that the use of pejorative terms about mental health problems are common in many children’s everyday language. While this is reflective of a wider societal problem, teachers can do their bit by cracking down on language when it is used in a derogatory or abusive way.

“Discriminatory language needs to be challenged,” says Walker. “Schools have come a long way with this on homophobia, but we need challenge the use derogatory words like ‘psycho’ or ‘schizo’ and the devaluing of clinical terms.”

Consultant psychiatrist Arun Chopra has said previously that misuse of terminology leads to misunderstandings about mental health. “You would never hear it used in relation to a physical condition,” he says. “You wouldn’t hear someone being described as a bit diabetic.”

Importantly, however – as has been pointed out before – language is just the visible surface of a deeper discrimination, so tacking language alone can never be the full solution.

Be aware

Unlike physical problems, some mental illnesses aren’t so obvious. “Only a couple of teachers and a handful of friends knew I was anything other than totally fine because I hid it,” says Lorraine Davies, who suffered from anxiety and depression at school. “If I’d been schizophrenic or suicidal maybe it would have been more noticeable, so, weirdly, I might have found more support and less whispering from friends behind my back as they tried to work out why I was being ‘weird’.”

For teachers, the key is to be on the look out for warning signs, according to Dr Raphael Kelvin, the clinical lead for Minded, a website designed to help pupils and teachers understand mental health issues. He suggests that teachers brush up on their knowledge of symptoms and never ignore a child whose behaviour fluctuates.

“If teachers understand that depression can strike not just when someone is saying they’re depressed, but also with someone who’s concentration and motivation has changed, they might be able to help them.”

Kelvin says teachers need to be alert, but do not need to become psychiatrists to help. If in doubt, he says, share your concerns with parents and other teachers to get to the root of the problem.

Help children tell their story to friends

“It’s very important to have a narrative about these things,” says Dr Kelvin, “people need a story to explain how things are. When kids come to the clinic after a period of difficulty, I often try to encourage them to have a story about their experience to explain what they’ve been through to their peers and friends.

“Often they either want to tell everybody or nobody, and the responses vary. The kid who tells everybody can become the butt of insensitive remarks; but the ones who tell nobody end up feeling very isolated. So how do they talk about it to their friends and how much do they want to say? What words do they need to tell their story in a way that’s not too painful? I think those are the kind of things that teachers can support pupils with. If you hear the story of why someone is behaving in a certain way you get a depth of understanding.”

Don’t alienate them further

A child who is experiencing mental health discrimination is such a delicate issue that approaching it clumsily or ignoring it all together can intensify the problem.

Davies says that a lack of understanding among certain teachers pushed her further outside the protection school should provide. “I was asked never to attend one teacher’s classes ever again as I was often late to his 9am because my anxiety was too high for me to get the school bus. Another went out of his way to provoke me – I think he thought I was a drama queen who needed a firm hand.”

Even teachers who are trying to help need to be careful, says Wilson. They should listen closely to pupils’ social concerns and approach issues with huge sensitivity.

“For instance, there are an awful lot of children who will have nothing to do with their classroom assistant because their friends laugh at them,” he says. “You’ve got to take that on board because their self-esteem is often at such a low ebb that anything will set them off. It’s all very finely balanced.”

 

Click on the link to read A Lack of Proper Sleep Does a World of Damage to a Child’s Attention Span

Click on the link to read What an ISIS School Looks Like

Click on the link to read Using Children as Bait is Abhorrent

Click on the link to read The Outrageous Pro-Gun Picture Book for Kids

Click on the link to read Sousa’s Techniques to Build Self-Esteem

 

 

A Lack of Proper Sleep Does a World of Damage to a Child’s Attention Span

November 29, 2014

sleeping

As schools push for earlier starting times to align with the need for working parents to get to the office on time and getting through an overcrowded curriculum, sufficient sleep and a proper breakfast are even bigger concerns.

 

Click on the link to read What an ISIS School Looks Like

Click on the link to read Using Children as Bait is Abhorrent

Click on the link to read The Outrageous Pro-Gun Picture Book for Kids

Click on the link to read Sousa’s Techniques to Build Self-Esteem

Click on the link to read Why I Believe Classrooms Should Be Fitted With Video Cameras

What an ISIS School Looks Like

November 23, 2014

 

isis

Does the indoctrination of young children get any more brutal than this?

In some ways, class at an Islamic State school doesn’t seem all that unusual: an instructor stands at the head of the classroom teaching children to read and write. But when it’s time for physical education, instead of running track or playing dodgeball, the kids learn to handle assault rifles and kill anyone who opposes the Islamic State.

A video released Friday by the militant group shows how foreigners are assimilated into the Islamic State. In this case, it’s a group of Kazakh men, women, and children.

The video — which appeared briefly on YouTube before it was removed by the site — starts by showing a group of Kazakh men training for combat. But the majority of the footage focuses on the kids, some younger than three years old.

One scene shows an instructor teaching students how to write their names in Arabic. Later in the video, some of the children appear to be quite comfortable speaking the language, fluent enough to easily transition between Arabic and their native tongue.

According to the video, the goal is to get the children comfortable with reading and writing Arabic so they can study the Quran. Their Islamic education is supplemented with training in jihad.

“We’re going to kill you, O kuffar,” one boy says in the video, referring to nonbelievers of the Islamic State’s brand of Islam. “Insha’allah (God willing), we’ll slaughter you.”

According to the Kazakh National Security Committee, more than 300 Kazakhs have joined IS as of November 18, including 150 women. No count was given on the number of children who have joined the group with their parents. The 300 figure is likely on the conservative side, and could come from a video released around this time last year that featured about 150 Kazakh militants who said they had come to Syria with their families.

 

Click on the link to read Using Children as Bait is Abhorrent

Click on the link to read The Outrageous Pro-Gun Picture Book for Kids

Click on the link to read Sousa’s Techniques to Build Self-Esteem

Click on the link to read Why I Believe Classrooms Should Be Fitted With Video Cameras

Click on the link to read Are We Doing Enough to Make Our Children Happy?

Using Children as Bait is Abhorrent

September 23, 2014

bait

What a disgusting, reprehensible and downright irresponsible thing to do:

 

An Alabama middle school is accused of using a special-needs student as “bait” in a sting operation that allegedly led to her rape.

The allegations resurfaced last week when the Department of Justice filed a brief saying the Alabama District Court made a mistake by dismissing the lawsuit brought by the girl’s parents, WAFF reports.

The botched sting was set in motion in January 2010 after the 14-year-old student at Sparkman Middle School told a teacher’s aide that a fellow special-needs student, a 16-year-old boy, had propositioned her for sex in the bathroom. The 16-year-old had a months-long history of sexual harassment and violent behavior, according to court documents obtained by AL.com.

 The teacher’s aide, June Simpson, concocted a plan to catch the boy “in the act” by getting the girl to wait for him in the bathroom. Simpson informed vice-principal Jeanne Dunaway of the plan, who court documents say did not give Simpson any “advice or directive.”

Simpson later told authorities that she felt the plan was necessary because earlier that school year, she told Principal Ronnie Blair that the boy needed constant supervision, and Blair informed her that he “could not be punished because he had not been ‘caught in the act.’”

Simpson allegedly told the girl to wait in the bathroom and instructed her, “Don’t do anything. Just get him to meet you and we’ll catch him.”

The aide later told authorities that she watched security cameras but saw neither the girl nor the boy go into the bathroom, so she gave up and left. However, the students had simply gone into a different bathroom, where the boy allegedly raped her, according to CNN.

Dunaway later testified that the 14-year-old “was responsible for herself once she entered the bathroom.”

The girl, who doctors confirmed suffered anal tearing and bruising, withdrew from school and her family ultimately moved to another state. According to a press release from the National Women’s Law Center, the girl’s formerly good grades dropped and she began struggling with depression.

The boy was temporarily transferred to an alternative school before returning to Sparkman, according to AL.com

After a criminal investigation resulted in no charges, the victim’s family filed a lawsuit against the school’s administrators. But the Northern District of Alabama District Court threw the case out. Last week, the Department of Justice filed a brief in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals stating that the District Court made a mistake and that the case should be heard in a different court. The National Women’s Law Center filed an additional suit against the Madison County School Board, calling the administrations response “outrageous.”

 

Click on the link to read The Outrageous Pro-Gun Picture Book for Kids

Click on the link to read Sousa’s Techniques to Build Self-Esteem

Click on the link to read Why I Believe Classrooms Should Be Fitted With Video Cameras

Click on the link to read Are We Doing Enough to Make Our Children Happy?

Click on the link to read Why Getting Our Kids to Toughen Up is a Flawed Theory
Click on the link to read  Stop Pretending and Start Acting!

The Outrageous Pro-Gun Picture Book for Kids

August 6, 2014

my parents open carry

I’ve seen it all! A picture book aimed at children with the intention of making kids aware of their constitutional right to bear arms.

Can we stop using picture books as a means to pedal propaganda? Can we instead use literature to foster kids’ imagination and understanding of people and their place in society. Keep the propaganda for spam and leaflet drops:

 

A new “wholesome” picture book by two Michigan-based authors aims to show children the benefits of having parents who openly carry handguns.

The authors of My Parents Open Carry say their goal is to provide “a wholesome children’s book that reflects the views of the majority of the American people, ie that self-defence is a basic natural right and that firearms provide the most efficient means for that defence”.

The book depicts a day in the life of the not-so-subtly named Strong family – Dick, Bea and daughter Brenna.

As the blue-eyed trio leave the house for a fun Saturday out, Dick and Bea “retrieve their handguns from the locked gun safe and check them to make sure they are loaded. They place the handguns in their holster … in plain sight on their hips.”

Going about their weekend chores, the pistol-packing pair bump into various townsfolk who admire their decision to “open carry”, including neighbour Mr Wright.

“I see you are both packin’ as usual, good for you,” he says, cheerily. “You just never know when you might need to protect yourself and loved ones … It’s best to be prepared I always say.”

Brian Jeffs, president of a pressure group called Michigan Open Carry, co-authored the book with Nathan Nephew, a founder of MOC.

On the MOC website, Jeffs sets out the benefits of displaying a large-calibre pistol while shopping and socialising.

“It’s true that open carry has many advantages: a faster draw, a larger calibre handgun and greater round capacity; sure it’s been shown to deter crime, and it is immensely more comfortable to carry in warm weather, but it is much more than that,” he writes. “Open carry brings gun ownership out of the closet. It shows your friends and neighbours, your state and your country that you are not afraid of taking on the responsibility of protecting yourself and the ones you love from evil.”

The MOC website also carries a list of positive comments apparently from sources including James Towle, host of American Trigger Sports Network (“Outstanding, outstanding…every person should buy five copies of this book…”) and Alan Korwin of gunlaws.com (“I love it…boy does this fill a vacuum!”)

 

vegetables

 

Click on the link to read Sousa’s Techniques to Build Self-Esteem

Click on the link to read Why I Believe Classrooms Should Be Fitted With Video Cameras

Click on the link to read Are We Doing Enough to Make Our Children Happy?

Click on the link to read  Stop Pretending and Start Acting!

Click on the link to read  Some Principals Seem to Be Ignorant About Bullying

Sousa’s Techniques to Build Self-Esteem

July 15, 2014

Courtesy of

self

I agree with nearly all these tips, especially the first one which is absolutely crucial from my experience. However, I do not advise teachers to shake their students’ hands. It is not appropriate and I would recommend teachers should desist from doing it.

 

Click on the link to read Why I Believe Classrooms Should Be Fitted With Video Cameras

Click on the link to read Are We Doing Enough to Make Our Children Happy?

Click on the link to read Why Getting Our Kids to Toughen Up is a Flawed Theory
Click on the link to read  Stop Pretending and Start Acting!

Click on the link to read  Some Principals Seem to Be Ignorant About Bullying

Click on the link to read Teaching Kids to be Competitive Often Leads to Needless Pain


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