Archive for the ‘Social Media’ Category

The Destructive Powers of Social Media in the Classroom

November 4, 2015

social-media-sleep

Social media can be a welcome addition to every teacher’s toolkit, but as long as it keeps your students awake at night, it can also be a concentration killer:

 

You’ve probably seen it – a teenager rocking to music blasting from headphones while also texting, checking out Facebook and watching TV.

And, supposedly, doing homework.

For those people who date back to pre-handheld-device days and who found it hard enough to concentrate on homework even without digital distractions, the sight of multitasking teens is mind-boggling.

It’s also more prevalent than you might think.

A new report by Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based non-profit that tracks children and their technology use, finds that teens age 13 to 18 spend almost nine hours a day – that’s longer than they usually sleep – on “entertainment media,” which includes things like checking out social media, music, gaming or online videos.

And that’s not including time spent using media for school or homework.

Meanwhile, tweens – those aged 10 to 12 – are not far behind, consuming about six hours of similar content, according to the report released Tuesday.

The study also found that half of teens say they often or sometimes watch TV (51%), use social networking (50%), text (60%) and listen to music (76%) while doing homework. You can bet that those figures include some who do all four at the same time.

 

Click on the link to read Teacher Busted for Lying Thanks to Her Facebook Updates

Click on the link to read Up to 1 in 10 US Students Have an Inappropriate Relationship With Their Teacher

Click on the link to read Facebook Exposes Yet Another Bad Teacher

Click on the link to read Why I Won’t Be Celebrating Facebook’s 10th Anniversary

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Teacher Busted for Lying Thanks to Her Facebook Updates

March 1, 2015

 

In my teens I adored the movie, “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”. My parents never let me take a day off school, and I was both envious of Ferris for cutting school and in awe of his ability to make fools out of Principals and senior administrators. Perhaps the teacher that ‘pulled a sickie’ in order to go on holiday, also had a soft spot for Bueller’s penchant for taking risks. What she didn’t have, was his smarts:

 

Some teachers never learn.

Brooklyn guidance counselor Mindy Robinson lied about having dental work so she could celebrate her birthday on a tropical beach. Then she boasted about the ruse on Facebook — even though many New York teachers have gotten busted the same way.

Robinson, who worked at IS 171 Abraham Lincoln in East New York, posted on Facebook a dispatch from her vacation in Turks and Caicos islands several days before the city schools’ spring recess in March 2013.

“So tell me how did u get off of work?” a Facebook “friend” asked.

“I had a small procedure that had to be done do [sic] I told the crazy one that the doctor was going to be out of town and could only do it this week.”

“Be careful,” the friend warned, “because two years ago people got caught doing things like that.”

“Too late but thanks for the info,” Robinson replied.

Robinson refused to speak with investigators and agreed to retire last July 1.

 

 

Click on the link to read Up to 1 in 10 US Students Have an Inappropriate Relationship With Their Teacher

Click on the link to read Facebook Exposes Yet Another Bad Teacher

Click on the link to read Why I Won’t Be Celebrating Facebook’s 10th Anniversary

Click on the link to read If You Ever Wondered How Some Kids Become Bullies …

Click on the link to read The Researchers into Cyberbullying Should Review Their Findings

Up to 1 in 10 US Students Have an Inappropriate Relationship With Their Teacher

August 16, 2014

andrea connersSurely there aren’t as many student/teacher relationships as suggested in this article. If it is anywhere near as bad as that, it is a terrible indictment on our profession:

 

Critics suggest that as many as one in 10 U.S. public school students — or about 4.5 million children — are involved in some kind of inappropriate teacher-student relationship.

But it’s not easy to identify — accusations involve everything from physical contact to inappropriate comments or looks — and can have a crippling effect not only on those involved but on the student body and their parents and educators.

“It’s devastating to the rest of our students,” said Dan Unger, president of the Northwest Local School District Board of Education. Two of the three teachers from his district have already been convicted and this year imprisoned. The third case is pending.

“When (the other students) think about the accomplishments of the class of 2014, they’ll think about that. This is what they will remember,” Unger said.

It’s become easier in a digital world where smart phones can dominate conversation, for teachers and students to communicate. That’s good when it’s used to discuss school work. But sometimes it can turn criminal.

“The biggest reason this occurs now is social media,” Abbott said.

A text, Facebook post, Instagram or Snapchat message can give teachers and students greater access to each other than ever before. All three of the Northwest Local School educators relied heavily on Snapchat, Facebook and text messages to communicate with the victimized students.

“It seems to be when the conversation goes private like that, the teacher says and does outrageous and outlandish things they’d never say in person,” Abbott said.

Those private contacts allow predatory educators to exploit students, enhancing the control teachers have over their students. Students want to be liked by or get attention from the educator.

 

 

Click on the link to read Facebook Exposes Yet Another Bad Teacher

Click on the link to read Why I Won’t Be Celebrating Facebook’s 10th Anniversary

Click on the link to read If You Ever Wondered How Some Kids Become Bullies …

Click on the link to read The Researchers into Cyberbullying Should Review Their Findings

Click on the link to read The Use of Facebook in Cyberbullying Activity

Click on the link to read A Positive Approach to Tackling Cyberbullying

Facebook Exposes Yet Another Bad Teacher

March 25, 2014

 

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Teachers have to be extremely careful when they post their opinions on social media sites. They must be careful to avoid criticising their students, especially when the students has committed suicide the week before:

A Northern Territory teacher who allegedly branded a former student a “brat” and a “bully” in a spiteful Facebook rant just days after he committed suicide has been sacked.

The teacher, who has not been identified, is accused of posting the insensitive message after the teen boy’s suicide last weekend, the NT News reports.

“You were a bully to kids smaller and younger than yourself, I saw you intimidate, stand over and beat up on younger kids (never anyone your own size),” the teacher’s alleged message said.

“You made life hell for genuine students wanting to learn and teachers trying to teach.

“You were a moody, disrespectful little brat in and away from school who was always given excuses by your parents and soft people in authority.

“Your (sic) gone, good no sympathy or empathy from me.”

Dozens of parents who saw the post reportedly called on the teacher to be sacked, the newspaper reports.

The Territory’s Education department deputy chief executive, Susan Bowden, confirmed the teacher had been stood down and tendered his resignation, effective 14 April.

“The teacher is not at school and will not return. This type of behaviour is unacceptable and will not be tolerated by the Department of Education,” Bowden said.

“The Department of Education deeply regrets the stress to the family and friends cause by this teacher’s alleged actions at this difficult time.”

It is believed the boy was not a student at the school at the time of his death.

 

 

Click on the link to read Why I Won’t Be Celebrating Facebook’s 10th Anniversary

Click on the link to read If You Ever Wondered How Some Kids Become Bullies …

Click on the link to read The Researchers into Cyberbullying Should Review Their Findings

Click on the link to read The Use of Facebook in Cyberbullying Activity

Click on the link to read A Positive Approach to Tackling Cyberbullying

Why I Won’t Be Celebrating Facebook’s 10th Anniversary

February 5, 2014

 

 

Facebook has proven not only an extraordinarily popular success but also an enduring one. In the ten years the social medium has been in circulation Facebook have become only stronger rather than a passing fad that one could be forgiven for assuming they would be.

But for all the good that Facebook offers, let’s not forget about the negative aspects.

1. Cyberbullying – Facebook has become the place for cyberbullies to insult and intimidate their victims. Even though Facebook claims to be vigilant when it comes to bullying, time and time again we have seen evidence to the contrary.

2. Privacy and Stalking – Unfortunately,  we constantly warn children about using the privacy settings because there are sick people out there who can potentially exploit them through their Facebook page. Nothing is private anymore.

3. Self-Esteem – Studies have shown that Facebook makes people feel worse about themselves.

4. Trivialising the concept of “Friends” – The meaning of the word “friend” has been greatly devalued thanks to Facebook.

5. Too Easy for Young Kids to Access – It might say you have to be 13 but a startling number of under aged children have their own Facebook page.

 

Click on the link to read If You Ever Wondered How Some Kids Become Bullies …

Click on the link to read The Researchers into Cyberbullying Should Review Their Findings

Click on the link to read The Use of Facebook in Cyberbullying Activity

Click on the link to read A Positive Approach to Tackling Cyberbullying

If You Ever Wondered How Some Kids Become Bullies …

November 10, 2013

ellen

What kind of rolemodels do you think these parents are?

A facebook group dedicated to criticizing ‘ugly’ babies proves that bullying is not just an act of teenagers.

The private facebook group, which has since been removed, is composed of grown women around the country who grab photos of toddlers from other mothers’ facebook pages without approval and post them online for criticizing.

The group was originally designed to trade and sell children’s clothing but took a nasty turn.

One mother, Melissa Anetucci, of Palm Beach, Fla. has made it her mission to fight against the self-proclaimed ‘mean girls group’ and to expose their wildly inappropriate behavior. She began posting the mother’s comments online in order to exploit their cruel remarks.

Anetucci told Wesh.com, ‘The things that these mothers said were the most horrific things that I have ever seen, being a mom and knowing that they are moms.’

Another mother, Ellen Veach, of Pheonix, Ariz. told Fox News she was terrified to discover that a photo of her 2-year-old daughter was taken from her facebook and pictured next to a cartoon character.

Veach says she didn’t realize that friends of friends could access her photos on facebook. It was a friend who notified her her daughter’s photo was circulating online.

‘So I’m posting pictures of my son’s first day in kindergarten or Ivy’s new outfit or something just naively posting it up there so my friends can see, not realizing there’s a group that takes these pictures and targets these children and makes fun of them. Like that’s just something I wouldn’t even think a mother or grown woman would do,’ Veach told Fox.

One ‘mean girl’ wrote, ‘Before I address this…It…I want to point out that it makes my heart happy that you have a Mean Girls tab in your computer. Good stuff. Now, # 1 is this a he or a she…You absolutely can not fix ugly. This is a God given example of such.’

Another facebook comment read, ‘An ugly baby thread. I have died and gone to heaven…why can’t you guys live near me so we can do this over cocktails?’

Another commented of a child, ‘It’s hideous.’

The parents of the children who were being bullied commented on the group’s page and asked the women to stop their lewd behavior, but they were none too kind.

One overwhelmed mother wrote, ‘This is MY DAUGHTER that is being made fun of because she is delayed…so funny, huh? Sick (expletive).’The photo was of her daughter in the intensive care unit.

One of the ‘Mean Girls’ responded, ‘THIS IS FACEBOOK, NOT THE SALEM WITCH HUNT….THIS IS A FREE COUNTRY AND I WAS LAUGHING BECAUSE IT WAS FUNNY….THANKS FOR YOUR COMMENTS, NEXT.’

Who is Going to Do Something About Cyberbullying?

October 3, 2013

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Cyberbullying continues to grow, even considering the increased public awareness of the problem. This is simply not good enough.

For too long schools have been avoiding the issue, claiming that what is done outside of their gates is not within their domain – Wrong!

Parents have all too often decided to ignore whether or not their children are of age to use social media and whether they are using these sites responsibly – Wrong!

Bystanders, aware of Facebook hate sites have often decided to stay out of a potential conflict and have either opted to sit on their hands or worse, tacitly encourage the bullying – Wrong!

Facebook claim they are working overtime to ensure that cyberbullies are not rampant on their site – Wrong!

When are the stakeholders and custodians of this problem going to take their collective blindfolds off and start fixing this terrible form of bullying?

More than a million young people are subjected to ‘extreme cyberbullying’ every day, according to the largest ever survey into online abuse.

The report found young people are twice as likely to be bullied on Facebook than any other social network.

Experts say cyberbullying can have a ‘catastrophic’ impact on self-esteem and have called for parents and regulators to recognise the seriousness of the issue.

Liam Hackett, founder of national anti-bullying charity, Ditch The Label, which produced the report, said many people assume cyberbullying is not as hurtful as face-to-face abuse.

But he said it can be even more distressing because it is more public.

The survey of 10,000 13 to 22-year-olds found that levels of cyberbullying were much higher than previously reported.

It found that 70 per cent of youngsters had experienced cyberbullying and one in five said it had been ‘extreme’.

Of those surveyed, almost 40 per cent said they were bullied online frequently.

Mr Hackett said: ‘I think there’s a tendency for older people to think that cyberbullying is a lesser form of bullying because there is this idea you can delete a comment or you can block it and it’s gone.

‘But actually, we have seen that content becomes viral very quickly and when comments are put out on a public platform it can be more distressing for the victim because a lot of people are exposed to this content, so it’s incredibly harmful.’

Facebook, Ask.fm and Twitter were found to be the most likely sources of cyberbullying, and 54 per cent of Facebook users reported cyberbullying on the network, the survey said.

Click on the link to read Engaging in Gossiping Isn’t as Pleasurable as it Seems

Click on the link to read The Explosion of Online Bullying

Click on the link to read The Researchers into Cyberbullying Should Review Their Findings

Click on the link to read The Use of Facebook in Cyberbullying Activity

Click on the link to read A Positive Approach to Tackling Cyberbullying

Kids Asked About Social Media: Funny Clip

September 30, 2013

 

 

Am I the only one that is glad there are still children around that have no idea what Facebook is?

 

Click on the link to read 5 Tips to Help Your Children Use Social Networking Safely

Click on the link to read Monitoring Children’s Social Networking Activities Proving too Difficult for Parents

Click on the link to read Parents and Teachers Should Not Be Facebook Friends

Click on the link to read Introducing the App that will Give Parents Nightmares

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Ugly Little Secret

Click on the link to read Who Needs Real Friends When You Have Facebook Friends?

5 Tips to Help Your Children Use Social Networking Safely

April 26, 2013

Written by Dana Udall-Weiner, Ph.D  courtesy of  psychcentral.com:

1. Talk to your teen about their time online.

 Talking to your kids about how they use social media and technology helps them break out of autopilot and become more mindful of their actions and reactions, Udall-Weiner said. “[This] is an important skill when it comes to developing emotional competence.” It’s important for teens to understand how being online affects them (such as their mood).

 She suggested asking your kids these questions: “Which websites do you often visit?  How do you feel emotionally, both during and after using these sites? Have you ever had any uncomfortable experiences online, or seen anything upsetting? Do you believe that there are any downsides to viewing the sites you regularly visit, or to using the Internet in general?”

2. Teach your teen to be media literate.

 A mistake parents often make, according to Udall-Weiner, is that they don’t teach their kids about media literacy. But it’s vital for kids to understand that what they see isn’t what they get online. For instance, “Parents need to actively remind their children that images are not reality—that no one is as thin, perfectly-muscled, unwrinkled, or flawless as that person in the ad.” She suggested visiting Media Smarts for more information.

3. Set time limits on Internet use.

 Teens are still developing their executive functions, which include monitoring behavior, organizing information and setting goals, she said. Plus, spending too much time on sites like Facebook can make teens feel worse. “My clients regularly tell me that they become very upset after looking at Facebook, since everyone looks happier, thinner, or more popular than they feel.” So parents might need to set restrictions on Internet use.

4. Surrender all phones before bedtime.

 “This is a way to ensure that kids aren’t up late texting or surfing the web, rather than getting precious sleep,” Udall-Weiner said. This rule also applies to parents’ phones, “since kids emulate what they see.”

5. Know the research about Internet use.

 Research has suggested that looking at images of thin models — which are splashed all over the Internet — may be associated with various negative consequences. “After seeing these images, people report things like decreased self-esteem, poor body image, depression, guilt, shame, stress, and an urge to engage in eating-disordered behavior, such as restricting food intake,” said Udall-Weiner. She also specializes in body image and eating disorders and founded ED Educate, a website with resources for parents.

Research also has suggested that the Internet makes us feel more disconnected from others, she said. “It’s important for teens to know the research on Internet use.” Talk to your kids about these findings.

 

Click on the link to read Monitoring Children’s Social Networking Activities Proving too Difficult for Parents

Monitoring Children’s Social Networking Activities Proving too Difficult for Parents

March 20, 2013

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It is very easy to advise a parent to take an active interest in their children’s online activities. It is much harder to put that advice into action:

After Friendster came MySpace. By the time Facebook dominated social media, parents had joined the party, too.

But the online scene has changed – dramatically, as it turns out – and these days even if you’re friends with your own kids on Facebook, it doesn’t mean you know what they’re doing.

Thousands of software programs now offer cool new ways to chat and swap pictures. The most popular apps turn a hum-drum snapshot into artistic photography or broadcast your location to friends in case they want to meet you.

Kids who use them don’t need a credit card or even a cellphone, just an Internet connection and device such as an iPod Touch or Kindle Fire.

Parents who want to keep up with the curve should stop thinking in terms of imposing time limits or banning social media services, which are stopgap measures.

Experts say it’s time to talk frankly to kids about privacy controls and remind them – again – how nothing in cyberspace every really goes away, even when software companies promise it does.

‘What sex education used to be, it’s now the “technology talk” we have to have with our kids,’ said Rebecca Levey, a mother of 10-year-old twin daughters who runs a tween video review site called KidzVuz.com and blogs about technology and educations issues.

More than three-fourths of teenagers have a cellphone and use online social networking sites such as Facebook, according to the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project.

But Facebook for teens has become a bit like a school-sanctioned prom – a rite of passage with plenty of adult chaperones – while newer apps such as Snapchat and Kik Messenger are the much cooler after-party.

Even Facebook acknowledged in a recent regulatory filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it was losing younger users: ‘We believe that some of our users, particularly our younger users, are aware of and actively engaging with other products and services similar to, or as a substitute for, Facebook,’ the company warned investors in February.

Educators say they have seen kids using their mobile devices to circulate videos of school drug searches to students sending nude images to girlfriends or boyfriends. Most parents, they say, have no idea.


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