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Archive for the ‘Child Development’ Category

The Effect of Online Pornography on Kids

March 22, 2016

children-acces

 

The effect of pornography on kids cannot be understated. Although, we’d like to think that children under the age of 18 are not exposed to such material, we know better.

Take this disturbing piece of news:

 

CHILDREN as young as four are performing sex acts on each other in remote Aboriginal communities, according to a WA parenting expert who says online pornography is warping young people’s minds.

Safe4Kids founder Holly-ann Martin told a federal inquiry that children in remote WA were “at far greater risk” of being sexually abused because of easy access to pornography.

“I have walked into a classroom where I have witnessed children as young as four simulating sex on each other,” her submission said.

“I was also called into a community because four-year-olds were performing oral sex and digitally penetrating each other.

“Young Aboriginal men openly admit to watching pornography, telling me they want to learn ‘technique’ or ‘style’.

“Because these young men are not receiving good sex education and respectful relationships education, they are turning to online pornography for information.”

 

Click on the link to read School Rewards Good Grades With an Earlier Lunch

Click on the link to read What Kids are Thankful For (Video)

Click on the link to read Our Students Show us Up All the Time!

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

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School Rewards Good Grades With an Earlier Lunch

December 16, 2015

woodrow-wilson-middle

Some schools think that their students are stupid. A struggling kid has a lot more on their mind than how far back they are in the lunch line:

 

A middle school is coming under fire for its incentive program, which rewards high-achieving students with a better spot in the lunch line, and forces less successful kids to eat last.

At Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Tampa, Fla., students who excel are rewarded with incentive cards, which give perks including a spot at the head of the line at lunch, according to Fox 13.  Students without the cards, who have to wait at the end of the lunch line, are referred to at school as “no card kids,” and some parents are concerned that these kids are being unfairly treated. “The no-card kids either have a ‘C’ or a conduct issue,” Woodrow Wilson parent Sonya Brown told Fox 13. “They eat last.”

While Brown says she believes in incentivizing kids for academic achievement, she says rewards should be for things like free admission to sporting events or homework passes. And some of the school incentive cards do include those rewards, as well as computer game time, free admission to a school dance, and a free cookie from the school café. But giving better students preferred spots in the lunch line, she says, is going too far.

Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Tampa, Fla., rewards high-achieving kids with better spots in the lunch line. (Photo: Facebook/Woodrow Wilson Middle School)

Alyssa Croker, an eighth grader at the school, says everyone knows why the “no-card kids” are at the back of the back of the line, and that those kids often only get 10 minutes to eat. “Everyone knows that they’re in line because they got a C,” she told Fox 13. “It’s not private at all. And it’s really embarrassing for them, I think.”

Click on the link to read What Kids are Thankful For (Video)

Click on the link to read Our Students Show us Up All the Time!

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

Click on the link to read Helping Kids Learn from Failure

Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video)

What Kids are Thankful For (Video)

November 23, 2015

 

 

I love how honest kids are!

 

Click on the link to read Our Students Show us Up All the Time!

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

Click on the link to read Helping Kids Learn from Failure

Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video)

Our Students Show us Up All the Time!

November 7, 2015

bobby

 

You just know when there’s a badly worded question that our students will pick up on it. Take the worksheet above for example.

 

 

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

Click on the link to read Helping Kids Learn from Failure

Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video)

Click on the link to read Celebrating Our Mistakes

Hilarious Video of Children Eating Candy

November 3, 2015

 

 

Trick rather than treat for these kids.

 

Click on the link to read Helping Kids Learn from Failure

Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video)

Click on the link to read Celebrating Our Mistakes

Click on the link to read Is Guilt a Motivator of Children?

Helping Kids Learn from Failure

November 1, 2015

 

groundhog-day

The Groundhog theory, that all mistakes are repeated until learned from is apt and extremely relevant to children of all ages. That’s why it is very important to give our students tips for helping to identify mistakes and failures and learn from them.

The following is a list written by Angela Stockman:

 

6 Questions that Help Kids Learn from Failure

  1. In what ways did this experience help you become more courageous?
  2. What did you learn about yourself from this experience, and how has this knowledge inspired you to make positive changes?
  3. How did this experience make you wiser?
  4. If you were disappointed by your behavior, how might you consider its more positive aspects? In what ways might you use the same behavior to be of service to others in the future?
  5. If your beliefs, actions, or work wasn’t valued by a particular person or group, what are you discovering about the kinds of people and groups that you should be seeking out? Where you can find them? Who are they?
  6. What is this negative experience inspiring you to learn, create, or do?

 

Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video)

Click on the link to read Celebrating Our Mistakes

Click on the link to read Is Guilt a Motivator of Children?

Click on the link to read What Kids Think About Love (Video)

If Adults Act Like Kids, How Are Kids to Act?

July 8, 2015

Before we start judging children, we should be looking at their so-called rolemodels. There is no point criticising kids today without first shining the light on us adults. Case in point:

There’s loud talking and phones ringing but theater etiquette might have taken a turn for the worst last week when a theatergoer climbed onstage to charge his dead cellphone.

The patron tried to recharge his mobile device in what looked like an outlet just before the production of Broadway’s Hand to God on July 2 in New York.

The attempt to recharge was, in the end, pointless – the onstage outlet was just a prop, created by Tony Award winner Beowulf Boritt, whose set is a realistic depiction of a basement of a church in Texas.

Click on the link to read The Benefits of Telling Lies Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video) Click on the link to read Celebrating Our Mistakes Click on the link to read Is Guilt a Motivator of Children?

The Benefits of Telling Lies

June 22, 2015

pinnochio

 

Apparently telling lies isn’t all bad. According to the latest research, children who lie seem to have better memory. Perhaps I should get my students to lie as a lead-up to a spelling test.

Then again, perhaps not.

 

If your six-year-old is a seasoned little fibber, don’t fret – it probably means he or she is unusually bright.

Scientists have found the first clear evidence that children who are good liars have better verbal working memories.

Psychologist Elena Hoicka, a member of the team from the University of Sheffield, said: ‘While parents are usually not too proud when their kids lie, they can at least be pleased to discover that when their children are lying well, it means their children are becoming better at thinking and have good memory skills.’

The study involved a quiz in which 114 six and seven-year-old children were tempted to cheat by peaking at an answer written on the back of a card.

First the children were given two easy questions: ‘what noise does a dog make?’ and ‘what colour are bananas?’

They were then asked if they knew the name of the cartoon character Spaceboy. Each child was left alone with an upturned card on which the answer was written, and told not to peek.

The answer, Jim, was written on the back of the card in green ink with a picture of a monkey.

Unknown to the children, they were being observed by a concealed video camera, so the scientists knew who had looked at the back of the card.

Children who got the answer right, and claimed they had not cheated, were tested with ‘entrapment questions’ based on the written answer and accompanying picture.

The children were asked if they could guess the colour of the writing or what the picture showed. If they covered their tracks by pretending not to know, or deliberately guessing wrongly, they were classified as good liars.

Children who fell for one or both of the entrapment questions, revealing that they knew more than they should, were rated as poor fibbers.

The results, published in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, showed that good liars performed better in verbal working memory tests assessing both mental processing and recall.

 

Click on the link to read How Babies Learn (Video)

Click on the link to read Celebrating Our Mistakes

Click on the link to read Is Guilt a Motivator of Children?

Click on the link to read What Kids Think About Love (Video)

How Babies Learn (Video)

April 7, 2015

 

Learning through observation and experience? Just wait a minute, where does an endless array of mundane worksheets fit into the equation?

 

Click on the link to read Celebrating Our Mistakes

Click on the link to read Is Guilt a Motivator of Children?

Click on the link to read What Kids Think About Love (Video)

Click on the link to read 5 Games that Make Kids Smarter

Click on the link to read Try Sitting Still as Much as the Average Student Has To

Celebrating Our Mistakes

March 30, 2015

 

 

oops

We all make mistakes. The idea is to own them and celebrate them in the classroom. That way our students can see that mistakes are OK, and they often help the learning process.

 

Click on the link to read Is Guilt a Motivator of Children?

Click on the link to read What Kids Think About Love (Video)

Click on the link to read 5 Games that Make Kids Smarter

Click on the link to read Try Sitting Still as Much as the Average Student Has To


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