Posts Tagged ‘emily forrest jeremy forrest’

If You Care About Your Students, You Don’t Do as Jeremy Forrest Did

June 20, 2013

 

forrest

Jeremy Forrest’s sister is well within her rights to defend her embattled brother – but surely she could have mounted a better case for attracting our sympathies:

The sister of a teacher accused of abducting a schoolgirl to France said she believed his caring nature had got him into trouble.

This was revealed as Richard Barton, prosecuting, said Forrest, 30, of Broyleside Cottages, Ringmer, could be considered a “paedophile” who “groomed” the 15-year-old girl who he is accused of abducting to France in September last year.

Today Ronald Jaffa, defending Jeremy Forrest, read out a series of character references.

Forrest’s sister Carrie Hanspaul  described her brother as “good-natured and extremely mild-mannered”.

She said: “He never has a bad word to say about anyone and always strives to do whatever he can to help other people and care for them.

“Unfortunately I believe this has contributed to his recent actions.”

His uncle, solicitor John Forrest, added: “He is deeply upset by the position in which he finds himself and is embarrassed and remorseful about the upset which he has caused to his friends and his family.”

Former colleague Susan Pinder, a retired teacher at Forrest’s first school, Bishop Justus CE Secondary School in Bromley, Kent, told how he had been teaching fellow inmates at Lewes Prison, while Dale Ives-Routleff, who was best man at Forrest’s wedding to Emily, said: “He was very unhappy at home and described his home/married life as ‘miserable, lonely and depressing’.”

Benedict Beaumont, a former ICT teacher at Bishop Bell School in Eastbourne – where Forrest taught, said: “Jeremy was one of the most gifted teachers that I have ever met.”

Police officer Terry Meegan, a cousin of Forrest’s mother, said that he was a “talented songwriter, singer and guitar player and was a member of a group called the Simpletons which played gigs to raise money for charity”.

Please click on the links to read two related posts on the same story:
You Don’t Warn Teachers Not to Have Sex With Their Students
Is Anybody Still Defending Jeremy Forrest?
Now that Jeremy Forrest is Arrested …
The Court System Should Deal Severely with Teachers Like This
Make an Example out of Jeremy Forrest
School Allegedly Turned a Blind Eye to Peter Forrest’s Relationship with Schoolgirl
Why Jeremy Forrest is Foolish and Megan Stammers is too Young

Now that Jeremy Forrest is Arrested …

September 29, 2012

A number of readers have disagreed with, my stance on the Jeremy Forrest/Megan Stammers relationship. They believe that a 15-year old girl should be able to decide who she wants to form a relationship with and be able to act on those impulses in any way she chooses. Likewise, they believe that while it is not ideal for a teacher to be having a relationship with a student, he should be treated leniently, because one should not be punished for falling in love.

I disagree slightly with the first contention and vehemently with the second.

Lawmakers have to use generalisations when considering laws. Megan Stammers may be the most mature 15-year old on the planet, but the average 15-year old relies greatly on a parent/parents to fund their lifestyle, organise their daily events, counsel them during vulnerable times and help make important decisions in their life. As much as the public seems to enjoy a ‘love conquers all story’, a child of 15 is more likely than not going to be safer and better looked after by parents than a married math teacher double her age.

As for Jeremy Forrest, I feel that this is the time to let the public see loudly and clearly that teachers under no circumstances should be allowed to get involved with a student. The first thing a teacher who has designs on a student should do is resign immediately. The second thing he should do is to wait until that child is of legal age. There is a significant level of trust given to a teacher of children. This trust is slowly being eroded thanks to the daily news cycle of teachers who act without professionalism and integrity.

It is the task of the courts to determine whether or not Jeremy Forrest acted properly. If, as it seems, he didn’t, I hope the judge acts ruthlessly. It is time for our teachers to witness what happens when a fellow teacher abuses the trust that is handed to him in good faith.

Please click on the links to read two related posts on the same story:

Why Jeremy Forrest is Foolish and Megan Stammers is too Young

September 27, 2012

An excellent opinion piece condemning maths teacher Jeremy Forrest and perceptively discusses the sometimes misleading maturity of a 15-year old.

This is utterly inexcusable — no matter what denials or explanations Mr Forrest offered his superiors, and no matter what story Megan may have told. For as every teacher and parent of a 15-year-old girl knows, they are simultaneously the most complicated, delightful, infuriating, charming, cunning and confusing creatures you are ever likely to encounter.

For a start, they usually look much older than 15: they’re often not only taller than us but, superficially, at least, seem more confident, too. They know exactly how to cut us down to size with a withering comment about how old-fashioned we are, and seize every opportunity to patronise us.

But the parent of a teenager learns not to be fooled. Hard experience teaches us that the minute we marvel at how adult they’ve become, they’ll throw a tantrum more extreme than anything they managed in the toddler years.

‘What’s the matter?’ we wheedle, pathetically, as they stomp off to their room, radiating fury and contempt.

We already know the answer. Everything’s the matter, especially us. Teenage girls want more of everything: more money, more sleep, more freedom, more clothes (this last is the easiest to solve — they simply take ours).

Let’s make no mistake: it is Forrest, not Megan or her mother, who is entirely to blame. The fact that his marriage appears to have been acrimonious is irrelevant. He is twice Megan’s age and it is his professional and moral duty to look after her.That means putting her best interests first — not using her emotional neediness to help him cope with his own inadequacies.

Her mother says Megan’s still afraid of the dark. Her friends report that she ‘can be quite vulnerable . . . she needs to be reassured quite a bit.’


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