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Posts Tagged ‘Downside of Facebook’

Facebook Exposes Yet Another Bad Teacher

March 25, 2014

 

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Teachers have to be extremely careful when they post their opinions on social media sites. They must be careful to avoid criticising their students, especially when the students has committed suicide the week before:

A Northern Territory teacher who allegedly branded a former student a “brat” and a “bully” in a spiteful Facebook rant just days after he committed suicide has been sacked.

The teacher, who has not been identified, is accused of posting the insensitive message after the teen boy’s suicide last weekend, the NT News reports.

“You were a bully to kids smaller and younger than yourself, I saw you intimidate, stand over and beat up on younger kids (never anyone your own size),” the teacher’s alleged message said.

“You made life hell for genuine students wanting to learn and teachers trying to teach.

“You were a moody, disrespectful little brat in and away from school who was always given excuses by your parents and soft people in authority.

“Your (sic) gone, good no sympathy or empathy from me.”

Dozens of parents who saw the post reportedly called on the teacher to be sacked, the newspaper reports.

The Territory’s Education department deputy chief executive, Susan Bowden, confirmed the teacher had been stood down and tendered his resignation, effective 14 April.

“The teacher is not at school and will not return. This type of behaviour is unacceptable and will not be tolerated by the Department of Education,” Bowden said.

“The Department of Education deeply regrets the stress to the family and friends cause by this teacher’s alleged actions at this difficult time.”

It is believed the boy was not a student at the school at the time of his death.

 

 

Click on the link to read Why I Won’t Be Celebrating Facebook’s 10th Anniversary

Click on the link to read If You Ever Wondered How Some Kids Become Bullies …

Click on the link to read The Researchers into Cyberbullying Should Review Their Findings

Click on the link to read The Use of Facebook in Cyberbullying Activity

Click on the link to read A Positive Approach to Tackling Cyberbullying

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5 Tips to Help Your Children Use Social Networking Safely

April 26, 2013

Written by Dana Udall-Weiner, Ph.D  courtesy of  psychcentral.com:

1. Talk to your teen about their time online.

 Talking to your kids about how they use social media and technology helps them break out of autopilot and become more mindful of their actions and reactions, Udall-Weiner said. “[This] is an important skill when it comes to developing emotional competence.” It’s important for teens to understand how being online affects them (such as their mood).

 She suggested asking your kids these questions: “Which websites do you often visit?  How do you feel emotionally, both during and after using these sites? Have you ever had any uncomfortable experiences online, or seen anything upsetting? Do you believe that there are any downsides to viewing the sites you regularly visit, or to using the Internet in general?”

2. Teach your teen to be media literate.

 A mistake parents often make, according to Udall-Weiner, is that they don’t teach their kids about media literacy. But it’s vital for kids to understand that what they see isn’t what they get online. For instance, “Parents need to actively remind their children that images are not reality—that no one is as thin, perfectly-muscled, unwrinkled, or flawless as that person in the ad.” She suggested visiting Media Smarts for more information.

3. Set time limits on Internet use.

 Teens are still developing their executive functions, which include monitoring behavior, organizing information and setting goals, she said. Plus, spending too much time on sites like Facebook can make teens feel worse. “My clients regularly tell me that they become very upset after looking at Facebook, since everyone looks happier, thinner, or more popular than they feel.” So parents might need to set restrictions on Internet use.

4. Surrender all phones before bedtime.

 “This is a way to ensure that kids aren’t up late texting or surfing the web, rather than getting precious sleep,” Udall-Weiner said. This rule also applies to parents’ phones, “since kids emulate what they see.”

5. Know the research about Internet use.

 Research has suggested that looking at images of thin models — which are splashed all over the Internet — may be associated with various negative consequences. “After seeing these images, people report things like decreased self-esteem, poor body image, depression, guilt, shame, stress, and an urge to engage in eating-disordered behavior, such as restricting food intake,” said Udall-Weiner. She also specializes in body image and eating disorders and founded ED Educate, a website with resources for parents.

Research also has suggested that the Internet makes us feel more disconnected from others, she said. “It’s important for teens to know the research on Internet use.” Talk to your kids about these findings.

 

Click on the link to read Monitoring Children’s Social Networking Activities Proving too Difficult for Parents


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