Archive for the ‘Social Media’ Category

Protecting Your Children From Online Porn Just Got Harder

January 28, 2013

app

I respect Twitter’s stance on censorship but it doesn’t make life any easier for parents:

The new video-sharing app launched by Twitter is running into some upstart problems as it is being filled with sexually-explicit content.

The ease and lack of restrictions on the service, called Vine, allows for racy users to spread porn quickly.

Like with Twitter, users are able to search the platform by hashtags, so technology commentors began realizing the problem when a quick run of the term porn- or a vast array of more specific sexual tags- immediately produces a host of dirty videos.

This new facet of the service strikes at a potentially perilous point for the company, as they are known to be very firm believers in the freedom of the users.

As pointed out by Tech Crunch, Twitter administrators are known for their censorship-free stance and only budge when it is a question of legality.

Click on the link to read This New Craze Proves that Adults are Just Bigger Versions of Children

Click on the link to read Parents and Teachers Should Not Be Facebook Friends

Click on the link to read Introducing the App that will Give Parents Nightmares

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Ugly Little Secret

Click on the link to read Who Needs Real Friends When You Have Facebook Friends?

This New Craze Proves that Adults are Just Bigger Versions of Children

January 1, 2013

hose

I never really liked the planking craze. It was silly rather than entertaining or especially creative. Baguetting on the other hand, seems like quite a bit of harmless fun:

First there was planking and then breaded cats. Now the latest internet photo craze: Baguetting.

As a Frenchman might say, this is baguetting to be ridiculous.

A group of celebrities and comedians have launched a unique internet craze of posting pictures of themselves creatively posing with baguettes in their everyday life.

Supplementing the loafs of bread for everyday objects – and in some cases body parts – the stick of bread makes appearances in the personal lives of Star Trek actor George Takei, Bridesmaids’ actress Ellie Kemper, and actress Marcia Gay Harden among dozens of others.

shining

wine

tie

baby

pool

hair

car

gunspear

Click on the link to read Parents and Teachers Should Not Be Facebook Friends

Click on the link to read Introducing the App that will Give Parents Nightmares

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Ugly Little Secret

Click on the link to read Who Needs Real Friends When You Have Facebook Friends?

Who Needs Real Friends When You Have Facebook Friends?

December 18, 2012

friends

It is a shame that many youngsters would prefer collecting Facebook friends rather than taking the time and energy to cultivate real ones:

Some people like to have a few close friends on Facebook, while others have hundreds who they barely know.

Researchers now believe that the number of friends you have can depend on how successful you are, and even how often you move.

Researchers from the University of Virginia and the London Business school say the ‘perfect’ number of friends actually depends on several socioeconomic factors, and varies from country to country.

Shigehiro Oishi, a psychology professor in the University of Virginia’s College of Arts & Sciences, and Selin Kesebir of the London Business School explored the benefits of social networking strategies in two studies currently published in the journal Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

‘In the age of Facebook, many Americans seem to opt for a broad, shallow networking strategy,’ they say.

‘Yet cross-cultural research has shown that having many friends is not always viewed positively outside the United States.’

One reason that Americans may prefer a large social network, the researchers claim, is because Americans move around a lot.

Another important factor may be the economic conditions at a given time.

‘When times are prosperous, your friends are less likely to need much help, whether it’s covering a hospital bill or providing babysitting, and so a broad network of friends is easy to maintain,’ they claim.

‘But when times aren’t as flush, having more friends might incur huge costs in terms of both time and resources.’

Click on the link to read Parents and Teachers Should Not Be Facebook Friends

Click on the link to read Introducing the App that will Give Parents Nightmares

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Ugly Little Secret

Click on the link to read Facebook and Child Exploitation

An Intimate 16th Birthday Party for 3,000 Gatecrashers

September 22, 2012

It’s like a B-Grade movie, only it’s real:

Riot police were forced to break up crowds at a teenager’s 16th birthday party after 3,000 people turned up because she left the Facebook event invitation open.

There were reports of six people hurt, three seriously, as shops were vandalised and looted, a car set on fire and street signs and lampposts were damaged in the northern Dutch town of Haren.

Up to 600 riot police were on the scene and at least 20 arrests were made, media reports said on Friday night.

As police broke up the crowds, stones, bottles, bicycles and pots of flowers were hurled at them.

The mayhem unfolded after some 30,000 people received the invitation from a girl announcing her 16th birthday party on Facebook.

Intended to be a small-scale celebration, the invitation went viral after the girl did not set the Facebook event to private and forgot to mention it was for family and friends only.

Groningen police spokeswoman Melanie Zwama told AFP: ‘She posted the invitation on Facebook and sent it to friends, who then sent it to other friends and soon it spread like wildfire across the internet.’

Reports said up to 3,000 people showed up in the town of only 18,000.

Some party-goers even wore T-shirts made for the occasion. One read: ‘Project Haren September 21.’

Others posed for photos outside the girl’s house for the event that became known as the Project X-Party after movie Project X (2012) about three teenagers who throw a birthday party which spirals out of control as the night progresses.

Police were on high alert as Haren braced for the event for most of the week. Locals were left to clean up the streets of debris in the aftermath today.

Click on the link to read Parents and Teachers Should Not Be Facebook Friends

Click on the link to read Introducing the App that will Give Parents Nightmares

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Ugly Little Secret

Click on the link to read Facebook and Child Exploitation

Parents and Teachers Should Not Be Facebook Friends

August 31, 2012

Trust me, as much as being friends with parents may have its benefits, it is not a good idea:

Jill Schulman-Riemer has taught nursery through third grade, and is currently a private tutor and educational consultant in New York City. She says teachers and parents should keep their distance outside of the classroom, particularly online. 

The trouble goes both ways, she warns. “Parents friending teachers and teachers friending parents can be a slippery slope. You put a lot of  trust in your children’s teachers. We all need to stay in our professional roles with each other, and Facebook just isn’t a place for that.”

“Talk to them off line,” Schulman-Riemer advises. “Don’t use email or Facebook messenger. Try an actual face-to-face conversation. Explain that, of course, you’re always happy to talk to a parent about their child or anything school-related, but your policy is that you don’t friend parents on Facebook, and you prefer in-person conversations.”

Sure, friending your kid’s teacher may sound like a nice way to have a more personal connection with someone who’s an important part of your family’s daily life. But information on people’s Facebook pages can easily be misread or blown out of proportion. And while teachers recognize that they’re being judged on student performance and how they present themselves in the classroom, they shouldn’t be held accountable for old college pictures, or late-night comments posted on their timeline after someone’s bachelorette party.

If you go out and friend a teacher on Facebook, or accept their friend request, you do so at your own risk, says Carrie Mize, who’s been on both sides of the fence, as a parent of three young children, and a teacher of pre-school and elementary grades in Michigan, Virginia, and Connecticut. 

“If you choose to open up the personal side of things, you have to understand that it’s their personal life and you may see things you don’t like,” She says. “A teacher’s Facebook page doesn’t have anything to do with your child. The teacher doesn’t have their teacher hat on, and if you see something inappropriate, you just have to let it go.”

Click on the link to read Don’t Even Try to Huminise James Holmes

Click on the link to read Teachers Who Rely on Free Speech Shouldn’t be Teachers

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Age Restictions are a Joke

Click on the link to read Facebook and Child Exploitation

Social Media: A Playground for Bullies

August 3, 2012

 

For all it’s benefits, social media is an invitation for bullies to wreak havoc:

The Internet can be a hostile place, and Twitter is no exception. According to a new study, about 15,000 bullying-related tweets are posted every day, meaning more than 100,000 nasty messages taint the digital world each week.

To further understand what happens in the virtual world, researchers from the University of Wisconsin in Madison trained a computer to analyze Twitter messages using an algorithm created to point out important words or symbols that may indicate bullying. In 2011, during the time of this study, 250 million public tweets were being sent daily — a number almost 10 times the population of the state of Texas.

Click on the link to read Teachers Who Rely on Free Speech Shouldn’t be Teachers

Click on the link to read Bullying is Acceptable when it’s Directed to a Teacher

Click on the link to read Punish Bullies and Then Change Your Culture

How Can Facebook Allow James Holmes Tribute Pages?

July 26, 2012

How can we trust Facebook to help us fight cyberbullying if they can’t even ban tribute pages to a murderer? How can we trust Facebook to protect our children from online predators when they can’t stop online propaganda championing a sick murderer? How can we trust Facebook when they claim to be enforcing their age restriction policy when they can’t even take a common sense approach to getting rid of James Holmes tribute pages?

I have no trust in Facebook!

While Facebook pages paying tribute to James Holmes — the alleged shooter in the attacks in a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., last week during the premiere showing of The Dark Knight Rises— may violate all standards of common decency, they apparently do not violate Facebook’s terms of service.

CNN reported that a “few-dozen” such pages have sprung up over the past week, including one with more than 800 likes.

The social network is caught in a no-win situation in cases such as this: If it removes the pages, it is accused of violating free-speech rights. And if it allows the pages to exist, users complain that it allows distasteful, hateful content on its network.

Facebook Spokesman Fred Wolens told CNN that the pages, “while incredibly distasteful, don’t violate our terms,” adding that “credible threats” against specific people or content with the potential to incite violence would be grounds for the deletion of pages.

The free speech argument must be used only within the confines of common sense. Facebook should be ashamed of themselves!

Click on the link to read Don’t Even Try to Huminise James Holmes

Click on the link to read Teachers Who Rely on Free Speech Shouldn’t be Teachers

Click on the link to read Facebook’s Age Restictions are a Joke

Click on the link to read Facebook and Child Exploitation

Teaching Young Kids to Throw Away Their Money

July 16, 2012

Facebook offers its users “free” gambling games,which they of course claim is restricted to children over 13 (but we all know how well Facebook police their own age requirement laws):

Members of Facebook, who must be aged 13 or over, can play a wide range of games traditionally associated with betting, including roulette, slot machines and card games.

Addiction experts have now claimed the games could lead children to becoming habitual gamers or even “problem” gamblers.

They believe the free games could lead youngsters to believe they are just harmless fun, setting them on a path towards betting with real currency.

A spokeswoman for charity GamCare added they would like the Gambling Commission to research social gaming and investigate it further.

Mandy Barrie, policy and development director, told the newspaper: “This is a really rapidly-moving area. We need to think through very carefully any risks that it presents particularly for young people.

“There is a link between early exposure to gambling and developing a problem in adulthood.”

These games are designed to get kids into gambling as quickly as possible. Facebook knows it, parents unfortunately don’t.

Click here to read my post ‘Facebook Doesn’t Seem to Care About Kids’.


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