Advertisements

Posts Tagged ‘Reading’

Strategies for Improving Reading Comprehension.

December 28, 2014

comp2

Via Mark Barnes

 

 

Click on the link to read List of Kids Books that Would Make Great Christmas Gifts

Click on the link to read Helping Children Become Successful Readers

Click on the link to read Children’s Hilariously Inappropriate Spelling Mistakes

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

Click on the link to read Why Spelling is Important at Starbucks

Advertisements

Helping Children Become Successful Readers

November 6, 2014

 

A good clip by Phyllis C. Hunter.

 

Click on the link to read Children’s Hilariously Inappropriate Spelling Mistakes

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

Click on the link to read Why Spelling is Important at Starbucks

Click on the link to read The Ability to Spell is a Prerequisite for Getting a Tattoo (Photos)

Click on the link to read This is What Happens When You Rely on Spell Check

Instructing Teachers to be Frauds

July 1, 2014

morpurgo

A good teacher relies on a relationship with their students built on trust. Our students will only take appropriate risks and be sufficiently motivated if they trust that the teacher is genuine and dependable.

I don’t care how well intentioned the cause may be, I am not about to pretend, cheat or con my students about anything. If a book I am reading makes me emotional, my students will notice. If it doesn’t resonate with me, I will most certainly not pretend it does:

 

Teachers should let themselves cry in class when reading poignant stories to help teach children that books matter, the author Michael Morpurgo has said.

Morpurgo, the former children’s laureate and writer of War Horse, said showing emotion in schools when reading sad tales should not be avoided, being an essential part of being a “good teacher”.

Speaking at the Chalke Valley History Festival, where he discussed his First World War novels, he added it was important to let children see stories can touch the adults around them, to help them learn the value of literature.

His novels, including War Horse and Private Peaceful, are known for their emotive subject matters and tell the often distressing stories about the First World War.

Speaking in front of an audience of children, Morpurgo argued it was essential to tell them the truth about life, without patronising them by “wrapping everything up in a little pink bow”.

 

 

Click on the link to read 10 Questions to Get Kids Thinking Deeper About their Books.

Click on the link to read 24 Books to Get Your Children Reading

Click on the link to read 17 Children’s Books You Still Love as an Adult

Click on the link to read The Telegraph’s Best Children’s Book of All Time

Click on the link to read The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

10 Questions to Get Kids Thinking Deeper About their Books.

June 25, 2014

 

A very worthwhile list:

questions

 

 

Click on the link to read 24 Books to Get Your Children Reading

Click on the link to read 17 Children’s Books You Still Love as an Adult

Click on the link to read The Telegraph’s Best Children’s Book of All Time

Click on the link to read The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

24 Books to Get Your Children Reading

June 19, 2014

 

reading and children

Courtesy of Huffington Post blogger Devon Corneal:

 

  • Ninja Red Riding Hood by Corey Rosen Schwartz
    First it was the Three Little Pigs, now Red Riding Hood is studying martial arts! Thank goodness, because how else can she be expected to fend off the Big Bad Wolf? If you liked The Three Ninja Pigs, you’re going to love this new take on an old classic. Get ready — KIYA!
  • Counting has never been so much fun. Detailed pen and ink illustrations splashed with color will keep young readers engaged as they try to spot the adventurous dragon.
  • Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson
    Tabitha Lumpit is loud and messy and doesn’t fit in with her very neat and polite human family. Timothy Limpet is quiet and tidy and doesn’t think he belongs with his scary, mucky troll family. So they do what any two kids would do — they swap places. While it’s fun at first, Tabitha and Timothy soon discover what we all know: there’s no place like home.
  • Little Pear Tree by Jenny Bowers
    Sometimes I recommend books just because they’re beautiful and visually interesting and feel good in my hands. This is one of those times. Little Pear Tree is a gorgeous, eye-catching explosion of color that invites little hands to explore the seasons with an array of images and words tucked behind cleverly designed flaps. Young readers will enjoy searching for the next hidden gem and grown-ups will want to do it right along with them.

 

  • It’s good to know things about our presidents. Important things. Like whether or not a particular president got himself stuck in a bathtub. These are the sort of facts I wonder about when I’m sitting by the pool drinking lemonade. Maybe you do, too.

(more…)

Why the Call to Fine Parents for Not Reading to Their Children is Utter Stupidity

June 17, 2014

 

sir michael wilshaw

Every parent should be reading to their kids. We all know that. Even those parents that don’t do it know they should. But should we be fining parents that don’t?

Of course we shouldn’t!

There are two very important points to make on this insane proposal.

1. If we as teachers are any chance of helping our students reach their potential we must work with, not against, their parents. We must be offering support to them whilst also regularly communicating and encouraging them. The best outcomes take place when teachers don’t judge the habits of parents but actively work to help refocus and empower them.

2. Teachers need to stop whinging and making excuses. Our students come to us from all kind of environments and family backgrounds. In any given class a teacher must expect that some students will be well adjusted and well trained whilst others may have issues and complicated home lives. This is the norm, and it is about time we embraced it. It’s part of what makes our job challenging, yet also potentially exciting.  It is because of this reality that teachers should never assume that their set homework will come back complete or that for example, a single mother with multiple kids will have the time to read with all her children on a regular basis. But you know what? That’s OK. We teachers are well equipped to overcome any such deficiency and help that child make up from any lost ground. Whinging and excuse making only serve to prevent the teacher from being accountable for the job they are doing with their struggling students.

“Don’t blame me for Tommy’s lack of progress. His parents don’t read to him!”

That’s why the insane idea of fining parents for not reading to their children is potentially quite destructive. It encourages bad vibes between crucial stakeholders and let’s the very focus, the children, suffer whilst the teacher and parents fight it out:

 

Parents who do not read to their children should be fined, the chief inspector of schools suggested yesterday. 

Sir Michael Wilshaw also called for headteachers to have the power to punish parents who miss school events or allow their child’s homework to go undone. 

The head of Ofsted railed against ‘bad parents’ who were not supporting their children’s education. 

Sir Michael, 67, accused white working class families of no longer regarding doing well at school as the way to improve their family’s future. 

Instead, pupils from migrant families were outperforming white British counterparts in the classroom because many held a deep cultural belief in the value of education, he claimed. 

Talking about his own days running a school, Sir Michael told The Times: ‘I was absolutely clear with parents; if they weren’t doing a good job, I would tell them so. 

‘It’s up to headteachers to say quite clearly, “You’re a poor parent”. 

‘If parents didn’t come into school, didn’t come to parents’ evening, didn’t read with their children, didn’t ensure they did their homework, I would tell them they were bad parents. 

‘Headteachers should have the power to fine them. It’s sending the message that you are responsible for your children no matter how poor you are.’

Click on the link to read Children are Precious!

Click on the link to read Is it Ever OK to Lie to Your Kids?

Click on the link to read 9 Characteristics of a Great Teacher According to Parents

Click on the link to read 9 Secrets for Raising Happy Children

Click on the link to read Brilliant Prank Photos Show Parenting at its Worst

Click on the link to read Little Girl’s Delightful “Brake Up” Note

 

10 Tips to Help Children Enjoy Reading

June 1, 2014

reading

Courtesy of uk.pearson.com:

 

Make books part of your family life – Always have books around so that you and your children are ready to read whenever there’s a chance.

Join your local library – Get your child a library card. You’ll find the latest videogames, blu-rays and DVDs, plus tons and tons of fantastic books. Allow them to pick their own books, encouraging their own interests.

Match their interests – Help them find the right book – it doesn’t matter if it’s fiction, poetry, comic books or non-fiction. Try our top recommendations.

All reading is good – Don’t discount non-fiction, comics, graphic novels, magazines and leaflets. Reading is reading and it is all good.

Get comfortable! – Snuggle up somewhere warm and cosy with your child, either in bed, on a beanbag or on the sofa, or make sure they have somewhere comfy when reading alone.

Ask questions – To keep them interested in the story, ask your child questions as you read such as, ‘What do you think will happen next?’ or ‘Where did we get to last night? Can you remember what had happened already?’

Read whenever you get the chance – Bring along a book or magazine for any time your child has to wait, such as at a doctor’s surgery.

Rhyme and repetition – Books and poems which include rhyme and repetition are great for encouraging your child or children to join in and remember the words.

 

Click on the link to read 17 Children’s Books You Still Love as an Adult

Click on the link to read The Telegraph’s Best Children’s Book of All Time

Click on the link to read The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

Click on the link to read The Classic Children’s Books they Tried to Ban

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

17 Children’s Books You Still Love as an Adult

April 13, 2014

 

places

 

List courtesy of huffingtonpost.com:

 

1. “The Story of Ferdinand”
ferdinand
“I think one of the joys of parenthood was re-connecting with books from my youth that I shared with my kids when they were little,” said Hank Zona.

2. “Go, Dog. Go!”
“I still love the dog party in the tree and ‘Do you like my hat?'” said Jim Britt.

3. “The Laura Ingalls Wilder books”
“Have reread them several times…as an adult,” said Ellen Whitford.

4. “The Phantom Tollbooth”
phantom
“The plays on words, the messages about the importance of numbers and words and feelings, the Jules Feiffer drawings… it just gets better with every reading,” said Anne Bagamery.

5. “My Side of the Mountain”
“Read it will all my kids,” said Liz Moore.

6. “Bridge to Terabithia”
“I think some of the upper elementary school/middle school books are more poignant than adult fiction,” said Melissa Wagner-Bigelow.

7. “The Giving Tree”
giving tree
“Makes me smile when I see it,” said Sherry Kerrigan.

8. “Katy No-Pocket”
“Such a sweet story,” said Linda Maltz Wolff.

9. “Favorite Tales of Monsters and Trolls”
“I loved the art in that so much, I recently spent $40 on Amazon for a somewhat ratty paperback copy of it,” said Chris Nesi.

10. “Chronicles of Narnia” series
narnia
“They opened up such a rich life of the imagination,” said Chris Schons.

11. “All-of-a-Kind Family”
“NY In the 19th Century. Family with five sisters, I had only brothers!” said Lisa Endlich Heffernan.

12. “Keeper of the Bees” and “Girl of the Limberlost”
“They’re straightforwardly moral — a throwback to a quaint and simpler time — and all about living in harmony with nature,” said Marcia Lawrence.

13. “Arm in Arm”
arm
“Circa 1969. My favorite book when I was around 4 or 5. Puts the world in a different perspective with artsy illustrations. I still have it. It’s in the bookshelf in my house,” said Hollie Reddington.

14. “Wylly Folk St. John Mysteries” series
“I was a HUGE fan… my daughter loves them, too,” said Faith Peppers.

15. “Sammy the Seal”
“Cause it was the first book I ever read,” said Robin Hoffman.

16. “From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler”
basil
“It totally fueled my imagination and made me dream of sleeping in the museum,” said Lois Alter Mark. “As a child growing up in New York, I used to visit the Met and try to find places where I could stow away and make that happen. To this day, when I visit, it brings back all those memories and transports me right back into the joy I experienced… that’s what a great book can do.”

“I remember growing up in Kansas and thinking how cool would that be to live in the metropolitan museum of art in NYC. well now I live in NYC and can confirm that this is city is like one huge museum and still very cool,” said Mary Lynn Manning.

17. “Chip Hilton Series”
“Those books that I read in the 1950s helped inspire me to become an athlete and writer,” said Mark Stodghill.

 

 

Click on the link to read Student Writes Nasty Letter to Teacher and Teacher Corrects it!

Click on the link to read The Telegraph’s Best Children’s Book of All Time

Click on the link to read The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

Click on the link to read The Classic Children’s Books they Tried to Ban

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

14 Books Featuring Inspirational Female Heroines

December 19, 2013

 

Courtesy of of The Huffington Post

 


The Paper Bag Princess – Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko
Let’s start at the very beginning, with a picture book that will encourage even very young girls to see themselves as the captains of their own destinies. When the titular heroine’s wedding to a prince is ruined by a dragon who steals away her betrothed, the princess replaces her burned up clothes with a paper bag and sets off to rescue him. That’s right – a princess doing the rescuing! I guess that makes her fiancé a gentleman in distress. Along the way, she learns about self-respect, independence, and being her own person. And for our pink-obsessed toddlers – the word “princess” in the title might tempt them to show some interest.


Ella Enchanted – Gail Carson Levine
This book also makes use of fairy-tale princess tropes – in fact, it’s a retelling of Cinderella. And yes, the heroine does fall in love with a charming prince. But in this book, Ella’s magical appearances at the royal balls comprise only a small part of her adventures. Cursed to be obedient, she spends the book struggling to overcome the enforced subservience that has defined her, and in the process must be rebellious, self-assured, and willing to break all the rules to find her own way in life. She tames ogres with her gift for speaking in tongues, and she refuses the man she loves because she knows he can’t save her from her curse. Actually, she saves his life with her quick wits, and he is the one who shows her tenderness and compassion. In the end, only she can save herself, and she has the force of will to do it. Ella is a funny, clever, brave protagonist who refuses to fit herself into the mold society has created for her.


The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
Chances are high that any tween you know has already read The Hunger Games … and seen the two movies. But if not, now’s the time. Our heroine Katniss has taken over the role of breadwinner after her father’s death, and she supports her family in a way women are rarely shown to do – by poaching game from beyond the city’s walls. Her skills with a bow and knife come in handy when she is thrown into the arena for a brutal televised event in which teenagers from the poverty-stricken districts surrounding the Capitol fight to the death. Suzanne Collins does an admirable job creating a cast of characters among which gender is the least defining characteristic. All of the teens, especially Katniss, must find a footing somewhere between ruthlessness and compassion in order to survive. Her ability to fight for self-preservation, with a determination long reserved for male characters, is well-balanced with her humanity.


Divergent – Veronica Roth
The dystopian world of Divergent seems set up to eliminate traditional gender roles. Each person is given a chance, at the age of 16, to choose a faction in which they will spend their adulthood. Factions are defined by the virtue they most value — courage, knowledge, love, selflessness, and honesty. It isn’t the women who are loving and selfless while the men are brave and honest; instead, each faction contains both men and women who exemplify these virtues. Our heroine, Tris, chooses Dauntless, the courageous faction, giving readers a daring, rough-and-ready heroine with action-hero qualities female characters are rarely given. She is adept with weapons, willing to undergo extreme physical pain in order to accomplish her goals, and, most importantly, always an agent. She’s not one to wait around for opportunities to pass by or for opponents to outmaneuver her, meaning she’s almost always in control of the situation.


The Lioness Quartet – Tamora Pierce
Tamora Pierce probably changed my life. She’s written a number of YA fantasy series about strong women, but The Lioness Quartet was the one that started it all. The heroine, Alanna, shatters the gender roles of her fictional world, Tortall, by conning her way into a position as a page in training for knighthood. When her sex is eventually revealed, her accomplishments are too great to deny, and she ultimately ends the restriction against female knights in her kingdom. Alanna is clever, strong, and able to take her destiny into her own hands – and while romance is never at the forefront of the series, the books grant her an unusual amount of sexual agency, which is still sadly uncommon even in books set in the modern day. Alanna’s freedom to experiment with romance and her sexuality is treated with responsibility, sending a great message about safety and protection while allowing her to be empowered to make her own choices.


Circle of Magic series – Tamora Pierce
Okay, just one more Tamora Pierce series! The Circle of Magic books are aimed at slightly younger readers, eschewing romantic subplots for straightforward adventure (and heartwarming friendships). The four protagonists, including three girls and two people of color (an unfortunate rarity in YA fantasy), spend the books learning to control their elemental forms of magic – and to use them to battle catastrophic threats to themselves, their loved ones, and even their society. These books emphasize the unique strengths each of us have within ourselves. I know I reread these books over and over, imagining what my special power might be. That’s a mental debate I want my daughters to have someday!


The Hero and the Crown – Robin McKinley
Robin McKinley has written a whole boxful of books perfect for young women – Rose Daughter, The Blue Sword, and Spindle’s End among them. But The Hero and the Crown was particularly inspiring to me. The protagonist, Aerin, is a social outcast despite being the daughter of the king. Her red hair makes her stand out, she can’t perform the magic other royals do naturally, and she hates needlework. But her penchant for more martial arts like sword-fighting ultimately makes her invaluable to the court that once gave her the cold shoulder. Aerin takes on potion-mixing and dragon-slaying over the course of the novel, eventually saving her kingdom from utter desolation. Though the book contains strong men as love interests, Aerin is the unquestioned heroine and leader of the quest – there’s even a fun role reversal in which the wounded princess is tended to after battle by a nurturing male companion!


Enchanted Forest Chronicles – Patricia C. Wrede
Like The Paper Bag Princess, the Enchanted Forest Chronicles turns the princess paradigm on its head by setting the royal heroine next to a dragon. In this version, Princess Cimorene is an independent-minded girl who hates being a princess – so she runs away to keep house for a dragon instead. Of course. Cimorene’s domestic duties showed me, a girl who loved baking, that girly stuff needn’t be entirely incompatible with courage and self-sufficiency. But more importantly, Cimorene is a badass who almost always manages to save the day – even the dragons need her protection! The books are written with a lighthearted wit that sets it apart from more melodramatic epics, making them welcoming to girls who aren’t established fantasy fans.


Caddie Woodlawn – Carol Ryrie Brink
YA novels set in historical times face an extra challenge: They must grapple with the very real restrictions suffered by women and girls in world history. Caddie Woodlawn features a tomboyish frontier girl who chooses a life running wild with her brothers rather than inside dipping candles. The Newbery-award-winning book inspires girls to question the gendered expectations that they live with and to embrace their adventurous, outdoorsy side. Of course, the historical frontier setting presents problems; Caddie’s ultimate need to “grow up” by becoming a subdued, presentable lady, as well as the deeply problematic representations of American Indians throughout the book, both require consideration, and an open conversation with your daughter about these troublesome aspects of the book might allow for a great learning experience.


Little Women – Louisa May Alcott
This beloved children’s classic has four heroines, three of whom don’t seem all that empowering (although we find them quite lovable nonetheless). However, the real protagonist, Jo March, is a real spitfire. Teased for being rough and mannish by her sisters and friends, Jo learns to embrace her bold and outspoken nature. Her ambition, which seems like an unlady-like distraction from domestic duties at first, makes her an asset to the family as she begins to earn money to support them with her writing, and while she somewhat tames her coltish tendencies as she grows into a woman, she never allows pressure to be feminine to change who she really is. As I grew into myself, I found Jo was increasingly my favorite of the little women – she embodies the empowerment we can find by celebrating the strengths and quirks that make us different from those around us.


Little House on the Prairie – Laura Ingalls Wilder
The Little House books, written by the same tomboyish girl who stars in them, offer a window into life in the frontier West – and Laura’s adventurous spirit, like Caddie Woodlawn’s, means she’s always getting her apron dirty running around the prairie, the woods, or the shores of the lake. But she also knows how to help her pa mend a roof and how to get dinner on the table. Like Caddie Woodlawn, these books also speak to a troubled time in America’s history, as we can see in the often stereotypical, othering portrayals of American Indians which should be discussed with young, impressionable readers.


Emily of New Moon – L.M. Montgomery
I’ve documented my adoration for Anne of Green Gables, but there’s just something about Emily Starr, the heroine of L.M. Montgomery’s lesser-known YA series, that really inspired me. Like Anne, Emily is smart, imaginative, and a bit different. Unlike Anne, Emily keeps her career at the center of her life, devoting herself to her writing and eventually becoming a successful novelist. Emily’s character is believed to be semi-autobiographical, as Montgomery herself was (obviously) a career writer. Though Emily’s story culminates in romantic fulfillment, she never wavers from her true self: driven, independent, and strong. She doesn’t change herself for love, and she doesn’t set her dreams of personal glory aside. Instead, she sets out to achieve them with self-confidence, and she continually perseveres in the face of setbacks and easy outs.


A Girl Named Disaster – Nancy Farmer
Nhamo, our protagonist, manages to flee a frightening fate and forge a path through the wilderness to a new life in this engrossing novel. Facing marriage to a cruel man at only 11, Nhamo runs away from the village in Mozambique where she grew up to search for her father across the border in Zimbabwe. Utterly alone, she must overcome the dangers of a treacherous forest, where she ultimately wanders for months, with nothing but her own wits. Such a journey would push anyone to the point of breaking, but Nhamo’s strength and heart keep her alive and moving forward. As a girl who’d read Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain with fascination, it thrilled me to read a wilderness survival story with such a compelling female lead – even girls who hate camping (me) can engross themselves in stories of girl vs. nature.


The Golden Compass – Philip Pullman
Lyra Belacqua stands apart from most girls I read about as a kid. Lyra’s sly, deceitful nature allows her to stay alive throughout the dangers she encounters in the series, but it doesn’t make her morally admirable, or even likable. Reading about a girl who is distinguished by qualities other than her essentially gentle nature is a great reminder that girls, like boys, come in a wide variety of personalities, each with our own strengths and flaws. And Lyra’s scrappiness, will to live, and canny mind make her a compelling heroine to get to know in the course of three epic books every kid should read at least once.

 

Click on the link to read The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

Click on the link to read The Classic Children’s Books they Tried to Ban

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

Click on the link to read Why Spelling is Important at Starbucks

Click on the link to read The Ability to Spell is a Prerequisite for Getting a Tattoo (Photos)

The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

November 24, 2013

 

tied

Don’t listen to anyone that tells you books no longer make a good Christmas gift. Below are some of the most popular current titles to help you re-engage younger readers:

New York Public Library’s new list of the century’s 100 best kids’ books
“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” by Judith Viorst, illustrated by Ray Cruz (1972)
“All-of-a-Kind Family” by Sydney Taylor, illustrations by Helen John (1951)
“Amelia Bedelia” by Peggy Parish, illustrated by Fritz Siebel (1963)
“The Arrival” by Shaun Tan (2006)
“Bark, George” by Jules Feiffer (1999)
“Because of Winn-Dixie” by Kate DiCamillo (2000)
“Ben’s Trumpet” by Rachel Isadora (1979)
“Big Red Lollipop” by Rukhsana Khan, illustrated by Sophie Blackall (2010)
“The Birchbark House” by Louise Erdrich (1999)
“The Book of Three” by Lloyd Alexander (1964)
“The Bossy Gallito / El Gallo De Bodas: A Traditional Cuban Folktale” by Lucia M. Gonzalez
“Bread and Jam for Frances” by Russell Hoban, illustrated by Lillian Hoban (1964)
“Bridge to Terabithia” by Katherine Paterson (1977)
“Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?” by Bill Martin Jr., illustrated by Eric Carle (1967)
“Caps for Sale” by Esphyr Slobodkina (1947)
“The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss (1957)
“Chains” by Laurie Halse Anderson (2008)
“A Chair For My Mother” by Vera B. Williams (1982)
“Charlotte’s Web” by E.B. White, illustrated by Garth Williams (1952)
“Chicka Chicka Boom Boom” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, illustrated by Lois Ehlert (1989)
“Corduroy” by Donald Freeman (1976)
“Curious George” by H.A. Rey (1941)
“Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus” by Mo Willems (2003)
“Esperanza Rising” by Pam Muoz Ryan (2000)
“Freight Train” by Donald Crews (1978)
“Frog and Toad Are Friends” by Arnold Lobel (1970)
“From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler” by E.L. Konigsburg (1967)
“George and Martha” by James Marshall (1972)
“The Giver” by Lois Lowry (1993)
“Go Away, Big Green Monster!” by Ed Emberley (1992)
“Go, Dog, Go!” by P.D. Eastman (1961)
“Goodnight Moon” by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Clement Hurd (1947)
“Grandfather’s Journey” by Allen Say (1993)
“The Graveyard Book” by Neil Gaiman (2008)
“Green Eggs and Ham” by Dr. Seuss (1960)
“Harold and the Purple Crayon” by Crockett Johnson (1955)
“Harriet the Spy” by Louise Fitzhugh (1964)
“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling (1997)
“Hatchet” by Gary Paulsen (1989)
“The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien (1937)
“Holes” by Louis Sachar (1998)
“Honey I Love, and Other Poems” by Eloise Greenfield; ill. by Leo& Diane Dillon
“Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaires Book of Greek Myths” by Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire (1962)
“The Invention of Hugo Cabret” by Brian Selznick (2007)
“Joseph Had a Little Overcoat” by Simms Taback (1999)
“Jumanji” by Chris Van Allsburg (1981)
“Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse” by Kevin Henkes (1996)
“The Lion and the Mouse” by Jerry Pinkney (2009)
“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by C.S. Lewis (1950)
#50 Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder, illustrated by Garth Williams (1932)
“The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1943)
“Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story From China” by Ed Young (1989)
“Madeline” by Ludwig Bemelmans (1939)
“Make Way for Ducklings” by Robert McCloskey (1941)
“Matilda” by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake (1988)
“Meet Danitra Brown” by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by Floyd Cooper (1994)
“Mike Mulligan’s Steam Shovel” by Virginia Lee Burton (1939)
“Millions of Cats” by Wanda Gag (1928)
“Miss Nelson is Missing!” by Harry Allard, illustrated by James Marshall (1977)
“Mr. Popper’s Penguins” by Richard and Florence Atwater; illustrated by Robert Lawson
“Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH” by Robert C. O’Brien (1971)
“Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters” by John Steptoe (1987)
“My Father’s Dragon” by Ruth Stiles Gannett, illustrated by Ruth Chrisman Gannett (1948)
“My Name is Yoon” by Helen Recorvits, illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska (2003)
“Olivia” by Ian Falconer (2000)
“One Crazy Summer” by Rita Williams Garcia (2010)
“The People Could Fly” by Virginia Hamilton, illustrated by Leo & Diane Dillon (2004)
“The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster, illustrated by Jules Feiffer (1961)
“Pierre” by Maurice Sendak (1962)
“Pink and Say” by Patricia Polacco (1994)
“Pippi Longstocking” by Astrid Lindgren (1950)
“Pyramid” by David Macaulay (1975)
“Ramona the Pest” by Beverly Cleary (1968)
“Rickshaw Girl” by Mitali Perkins, illustrated by Jamie Hogan (2007)
“Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry” by Mildred Taylor (1976)
“Rumpelstiltskin” by Paul O. Zelinsky (1986)
“A Sick Day for Amos McGee” by Philip Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead (2010)
“The Snowy Day” by Ezra Jack Keats (1962)
“Stone Soup” by Marcia Brown (1947)
“The Stories Julian Tells” by Ann Cameron, illustrated by Ann Strugnell (1981)
“The Story of Ferdinand” by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson (1936)
“Strega Nona” by Tomie de Paola (1975)
“Swimmy” by Leo Lionni (1963)
“Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” by William Steig (1969)
“Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing” by Judy Blume (1972)
“Tar Beach” by Faith Ringgold (1991)
“The Tales of Uncle Remus: The Adventures of Brer Rabbit” by Julius Lester, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney (1987)
“Ten Nine Eight” by Molly Bang (1983)
“Tomie dePaola’s Mother Goose” by Tomie dePaola (1985)
“The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” by Jon Scieszka, illustrated by Lane Smith (1989)
“Tuesday” by David Wiesner (1991)
“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle (1979)
“The Watsons Go to Birmingham, 1963” by Christopher Paul Curtis (1995)
“The Westing Game” by Ellen Raskin (1978)
“When You Reach Me” by Rebecca Stead (2009)
“Where Is the Green Sheep?” by Mem Fox, illustrated by Judy Horacek (2004)
“Where the Wild Things Are” by Maurice Sendak (1963)
“Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears” by Verna Aardema, illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon (1975)
“Winnie-the-Pooh” by A.A. Milne, illustrated by E.H. Shepard (1926)
“A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle (1962)

 

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

Click on the link to read The Classic Children’s Books they Tried to Ban

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

Click on the link to read Why Spelling is Important at Starbucks

Click on the link to read The Ability to Spell is a Prerequisite for Getting a Tattoo (Photos)

Click on the link to read This is What Happens When You Rely on Spell Check

 


%d bloggers like this: