Posts Tagged ‘Kid’s Books’

The Other “F” Word

January 21, 2020

The first line in my well-received new novel is, “I’m so fat.”

It elicits cheeky giggles whenever I used to read it out. Kids are not used to hearing that word anymore and are especially surprised that a major character in a kid’s book nonchalantly expresses such a candid self-reflection.

By the end of the first page, my audience grows to love the character and appreciate his honesty. Cheeky giggles are replaced with unabashed giggles. Finally, a character that feels comfortable to express the thoughts that many of us feel on a daily basis – seems to be the consensus.

When I first started reading the then-unfinished manuscript, a student approached me and told me how much the character of Jake meant to her. She told me that she had been ignored and disrespected because of her weight and it was inspiring to see those very same students that have ostracised her completely warmed to the fat character and instantly accepted him. She told me it gives her hope that the overweight kid can achieve some positive attention for a change.

I asked her what her name was.

“Nina”, she replied.

I told her I would name one of the major characters “Nina” because her words had moved me so much.

Nina is probably an adult now and probably has no recollection of that day and the origins of her namesake in my book. But her reaction has not been unique.

As a teacher, I’ve had the opportunity to read my book to thousands of students along the journey. There is a good reason why the word “fat” is frowned upon and there is a logic behind society’s reluctance to explicitly draw attention to weight.

But fat people know they are fat and are looking for a character that can own up to it and then prosecute the case why being overweight should never overshadow a person’s spirit, wisdom and achievements.

Enter Jake Archibald and the book, My Favourite Comedian.

Thank you, Nina!

 

Special Announcement:

I am donating 100% of the royalties of my hilarious new children’s book, My Favourite Comedian, during the month of January to those affected by the devastating bushfires in my country, Australia. This book is perfect for children aged 9 to 14 and the ideal class novel for Upper Primary students. Please leave a comment to indicate your purchase. You can buy a copy by clicking on this link.

 

Top 10 Female Characters in Kids Books

January 13, 2020

 

The following is a list adapted from an article by Allison McDonald. The criteria is that the character had to show girls how to be fierce and fearless:

#10) Beatrice Prior from The Divergent Series by Veronica Roth
Brave doesn’t seem like a strong enough word for Tris. She is more than brave — she seems propelled to do the right thing no matter what stands in her way.

#9) Pippi from Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Pippi is the self-proclaimed strongest girl in the world…and she lives with a monkey named Mr. Nilsson! If that’s not reason enough for her inclusion on this list, you’ll have to re-read this classic to find a million more.

#8) Ramona Quimby from The Ramona Series by Beverly Cleary
Ramona is far from perfect but she has a huge heart, a creative mind, and never loses sight of who she is.

#7) Princess Truly from Princess Truly in I Am Truly by Kelly Greenawalt
Brimming with confidence, this diverse character has no problem loving herself. Princess Truly teaches your child about self-acceptance and self-love, showing that she can do whatever it is she sets her mind to. Talk about princess power!

#6) Anne Shirley from Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Anne Shirley has to have puffed sleeves, bravely saves her best friend’s sister, and even walks along the rooftop to show she isn’t afraid. She stands up for herself, her friends, and for what is right many times over —showing her strength and confidence each and every time.

#5) Cleopatra from the Cleopatra in Space series by Mike Maihack
Time traveling and saving the galaxy? What can’t this girl do? Cleopatra shows the universe who’s boss when her 15-year-old self travels into the future to save all of humanity. With a lot of drive, determination, bravery, and a little sass, this traveling queen knows who’s boss and plans to show the world just that.

#4) Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games Series by Suzanne Collins
When I read how Katniss volunteered to take her sister’s place as tribute, I cried. When I saw the scene on film, I cried. And now, years later, writing about it, I still have chills. Sure, she fights and shows strength in so many other ways, but that one act is central to her character, and why she is one of the best female characters you will find on this list.

#3) Matilda Wormwood from Matilda by Roald Dahl
There is something incredibly calm and self-assured about Matilda. She knows her family is filled with idiots, she knows she’s not an idiot, and at a very young age she goes about educating herself because no one else seems to care.

#2) Nancy Drew from the Nancy Drew series by Carolyn Keene
If there’s a mystery to solve, Nancy is on the job. With a magnifying glass and a keen sense of wonder, Nancy Drew can decipher any question and her bravery is no match for the cases thrown her way.

#1) Hermione Granger from The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
I could wax poetic about Hermione Ganger for days. Her intellect is apparent from the start, as is her drive to succeed. She saves Ron and Harry countless times during the series, but her most heroic act is saving her parents. I don’t want to ruin this for anyone who hasn’t read the final book, but let me just warn you there will be tears. You will be awed not only by the depth of her strength but by the depth of the love that fuels it. Oh, one more reason Hermione is my #1 pick? For the time she punched Malfoy. (I know hitting is wrong, but I know you cheered while reading that too!)

 

Special Announcement:

I am donating 100% of the royalties of my hilarious new children’s book, My Favourite Comedian, during the month of January to those affected by the devastating bushfires in my country, Australia. This book is perfect for children aged 9 to 14 and the ideal class novel for Upper Primary students. Please leave a comment to indicate your purchase. You can buy a copy by clicking on this link.

My Latest Book Interview

December 29, 2019

 

It has been a great thrill for me to publish my debut novel. Below is the transcript of my latest interview.

 

What is your e-reading device of choice?
The Kindle is now waterproof, which is perfect for me as I love to read in the shower. I hope the next edition is shampoo and conditioner proof.
What book marketing techniques have been most effective for you?
I have found that not taking no for an answer has been the best strategy. That tactic worked to finally persuade my wife to read the book.
Describe your desk
My desk happens to look a lot like a kitchen table. In fact, it is a kitchen table. Used cereal boxes make for great mouse pads.
Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I grew up in Melbourne, Australia which is a lot like Melbourne, Florida aside from the beautiful climate and great beaches. Australians are fun-loving and easy-going people. I’m surprised they haven’t deported me yet.
When did you first start writing?
I once wrote a letter of appeal for a traffic violation. I wrote a very convincing letter. I knew then that I could make it as a struggling writer.
What’s the story behind your latest book?
This book was never supposed to be written. What started as a summer project that was abandoned after just two chapters slowly turned into a completed work. And the credit goes entirely to my students.
Back in 2002, whilst I was a mere student teacher, I noticed that kids weren’t utilising their quiet reading time very well. In fact, they were staring off into space. I decided to print off the two chapters as a means to provide the students with another reading option. Not only were they suddenly engaged in what they were reading, but they brought it home to their parents. I was getting messages from parents requesting the next chapter. And this started my journey towards completing the novel. This certainly wouldn’t have happened were it not for the support and encouragement of my wonderful students over the many years!
What motivated you to become an indie author?
It is the perfect career move for me at the moment as I transition to my ultimate dream job – telemarketer!
What is the greatest joy of writing for you?
Sharing your story and the characters you love with the world. That, and getting off parking fines.
What do your fans mean to you?
My uncle means the world to me.
What are you working on next?
I am working on two titles:
The A-Z Guide to the Alphabet; and
Mannequins for Dummies
What inspires you to get out of bed each day?
A nice, warm Kindle shower.
When you’re not writing, how do you spend your time?
I am a social justice warrior. The other day I protested against cuts to the police force by handcuffing myself to a policeman.
How do you discover the ebooks you read?
I use the same method of discovery as Christopher Columbus – Google.
Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?
I was 4 years old and got myself in heaps of trouble. Permanent marker is hard to get off wallpaper.
What is your writing process?
Sit at the kitchen table. Turn on the computer. Brainstorm. Give up and watch a YouTube cat video. Reward myself with chocolate.
Do you remember the first story you ever read, and the impact it had on you?
War and Peace. It totally changed my life. I loaned a copy to Kim Jong Un, but as of yet, he’s only read the first half.
How do you approach cover design?
I get someone else to do it. I can’t even make my stick figures symmetrical.
What are your five favorite books, and why?

How to Win Friends and Influence People – How I got my wife to read my book

The Art of the Deal – Pure comedy. One of the funniest books ever written.

The Achievements of Kim Kardashian – Available in pamphlet form

The Mueller Report – I once had insomnia. No more.

Grease – Not the movie, just a Jewish cookbook.

What do you read for pleasure?
The television guide.
What was your greatest achievement?
I once got the lead part in my school’s production of Fiddler on the Roof. Unfortunately, I didn’t get to perform it. I got injured during rehearsals. I fell off the roof.
spotlight
Michael Grossman is the author of the hilarious new children’s book, My Favourite Comedian. You can buy a copy by clicking on this link.

List of Body Positive Books for Kids

January 13, 2015

body positive

A great list courtesy of thehuffingtonpost.com

 

  • Flora and the Flamingo and its sequel, Flora and the Penguin, age 4+. These charming, wordless picture books feature a spunky yet graceful little girl. Flora has a pear-shaped body, yet does a ballet pas de deux with a flamingo in the first book and figure skates with a penguin in the second. So many images in books, movies, magazines and ads feature young girls with slim bodies; it’s nice to see an image of a girl with a round tummy who’s athletic, graceful and creative.
  • Brontorina, by James Howe and illustrated by Randy Cecil, age 4+. When a brontosaurus shows up at ballet class, some of the students insist, “You are too big!” But the open-minded ballet teacher decides the problem is that her studio is too small — and moves the class outdoors. It’s a lighthearted lesson about not letting your size or shape prevent you from following your dream.
  • Freckleface Strawberry, age 5+. The main character feels self-conscious about her freckles, especially when other kids make comments and give her a nickname she doesn’t like. The final message isn’t that her freckles are beautiful, but that maybe they don’t matter. More important, people are happier when they accept who they are and what they look like.
  • Firebird, by Misty Copeland, age 5+. A young girl who wants to be a dancer almost gives up before ballet great Misty Copeland inspires and mentors her to reach her full potential in this exuberant picture book that emphasizes hard work and self-discovery.
  • Ivy + Bean, age 6+. Two “opposite” 7-year-old girls become best friends in the first of a wonderful 10-volume series. Bean is a rough-and-tumble tomboy who wears pants and a T-shirt and gets dirty; Ivy wears dresses, thinks a lot and is always reading books. They appreciate each other’s qualities, and the kids in their neighborhood appreciate them for their uniqueness and imagination.
  • Confessions of a So-Called Middle Child and its sequel, Watch Out Hollywood!: More Confessions of a So-Called Middle Child, age 8+. In the first book, Charlie shows she’s comfortable with her out-of-shape body (while trying to make healthy food choices) and confident in her bold sense of style. In the sequel, when she tries out for a TV show, kids tease her about her body, but the TV people admire her for being comfortable with her shape. It’s a refreshing, positive-body-image message to find in a book about middle school.
  • Harry Potter series, age 8+. Hermione is part of the triangle of main characters, and she’s smarter and does better in school than Harry and Ron. Her looks are never a focus, even when the kids become teens, go to dances and start to have crushes. It’s always about who she is as a person and her outstanding abilities.
  • Randi Rhodes Ninja Detective: The Case of the Time-Capsule Bandit, by Octavia Spencer, age 8+. Randi moves to a new town and becomes best friends with two boys who also are outsiders; one is bullied for being hearing impaired but is as passionate about martial arts as Randi is, and the other is lanky, into music and super smart. Together the diverse pals — Randi’s white, and her friends are Latino and African-American — solve a mystery using brains and the occasional Bruce Lee move.
  • Blubber, age 9+. An overweight girl is teased mercilessly by some classmates, and no one stands up for her in this brutally honest look at (pre-Internet-era) bullying among fifth graders. The novel doesn’t spell out moral lessons but teaches kids by portraying repugnant behavior and showing the value of true friendship and courage under peer pressure.
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Ugly Truth, age 9+. Middle schooler Greg Heffley goes through puberty in this series installment and suffers the indignity of teeth-fixing head gear. He deals with it all through humor and utter cluelessness, as always. He may not become more accepting of himself, but kids reading about his travails understand that everyone goes through this stage and that you can have a good laugh at the embarrassing stuff instead of being quietly embarrassed.
  • Grace, Gold, and Glory: My Leap of Faith, by Gabby Douglas and Michelle Burford, age 10+. This moving memoir shows the Olympic gymnast’s dedication in the face of homelessness, bullying and having a coach tell her she should get a nose job. Gabby stays focused, works hard and accepts herself as she is, even as she strives for greatness.
  • The Girl of Fire and Thorns, age 12+. A plump princess is chosen by God (in a fictional religion) for a special unknown task. She begins the book as intelligent but insecure and afraid and ends it confident and powerful.​ Rising to challenges and having faith in yourself are big lessons here — as is the message that any size girl can be a respected and capable leader.​
  • InReal Life, age 12+. An exciting graphic novel about a teen girl gamer who learns about harsh working conditions in other parts of the world. She’s smart, competent, and compassionate, both in real life and as her online avatar.

 

Click on the link to read Sometimes You Need to Expect Rudeness

Click on the link to read Do We Learn Enough From Children?

Click on the link to read Kids as Young as 7 Diagnosed with Anorexia

Click on the link to read The Destructive Impact of the “Fashion Police” Brigade

Click on the link to read The Plus Sized Barbie Debate Misses the Point

17 Children’s Books You Still Love as an Adult

April 13, 2014

 

places

 

List courtesy of huffingtonpost.com:

 

1. “The Story of Ferdinand”
ferdinand
“I think one of the joys of parenthood was re-connecting with books from my youth that I shared with my kids when they were little,” said Hank Zona.

2. “Go, Dog. Go!”
“I still love the dog party in the tree and ‘Do you like my hat?'” said Jim Britt.

3. “The Laura Ingalls Wilder books”
“Have reread them several times…as an adult,” said Ellen Whitford.

4. “The Phantom Tollbooth”
phantom
“The plays on words, the messages about the importance of numbers and words and feelings, the Jules Feiffer drawings… it just gets better with every reading,” said Anne Bagamery.

5. “My Side of the Mountain”
“Read it will all my kids,” said Liz Moore.

6. “Bridge to Terabithia”
“I think some of the upper elementary school/middle school books are more poignant than adult fiction,” said Melissa Wagner-Bigelow.

7. “The Giving Tree”
giving tree
“Makes me smile when I see it,” said Sherry Kerrigan.

8. “Katy No-Pocket”
“Such a sweet story,” said Linda Maltz Wolff.

9. “Favorite Tales of Monsters and Trolls”
“I loved the art in that so much, I recently spent $40 on Amazon for a somewhat ratty paperback copy of it,” said Chris Nesi.

10. “Chronicles of Narnia” series
narnia
“They opened up such a rich life of the imagination,” said Chris Schons.

11. “All-of-a-Kind Family”
“NY In the 19th Century. Family with five sisters, I had only brothers!” said Lisa Endlich Heffernan.

12. “Keeper of the Bees” and “Girl of the Limberlost”
“They’re straightforwardly moral — a throwback to a quaint and simpler time — and all about living in harmony with nature,” said Marcia Lawrence.

13. “Arm in Arm”
arm
“Circa 1969. My favorite book when I was around 4 or 5. Puts the world in a different perspective with artsy illustrations. I still have it. It’s in the bookshelf in my house,” said Hollie Reddington.

14. “Wylly Folk St. John Mysteries” series
“I was a HUGE fan… my daughter loves them, too,” said Faith Peppers.

15. “Sammy the Seal”
“Cause it was the first book I ever read,” said Robin Hoffman.

16. “From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler”
basil
“It totally fueled my imagination and made me dream of sleeping in the museum,” said Lois Alter Mark. “As a child growing up in New York, I used to visit the Met and try to find places where I could stow away and make that happen. To this day, when I visit, it brings back all those memories and transports me right back into the joy I experienced… that’s what a great book can do.”

“I remember growing up in Kansas and thinking how cool would that be to live in the metropolitan museum of art in NYC. well now I live in NYC and can confirm that this is city is like one huge museum and still very cool,” said Mary Lynn Manning.

17. “Chip Hilton Series”
“Those books that I read in the 1950s helped inspire me to become an athlete and writer,” said Mark Stodghill.

 

 

Click on the link to read Student Writes Nasty Letter to Teacher and Teacher Corrects it!

Click on the link to read The Telegraph’s Best Children’s Book of All Time

Click on the link to read The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

Click on the link to read The Classic Children’s Books they Tried to Ban

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

The New York Public Library’s 100 Most Requested Children’s Books

November 24, 2013

 

tied

Don’t listen to anyone that tells you books no longer make a good Christmas gift. Below are some of the most popular current titles to help you re-engage younger readers:

New York Public Library’s new list of the century’s 100 best kids’ books
“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” by Judith Viorst, illustrated by Ray Cruz (1972)
“All-of-a-Kind Family” by Sydney Taylor, illustrations by Helen John (1951)
“Amelia Bedelia” by Peggy Parish, illustrated by Fritz Siebel (1963)
“The Arrival” by Shaun Tan (2006)
“Bark, George” by Jules Feiffer (1999)
“Because of Winn-Dixie” by Kate DiCamillo (2000)
“Ben’s Trumpet” by Rachel Isadora (1979)
“Big Red Lollipop” by Rukhsana Khan, illustrated by Sophie Blackall (2010)
“The Birchbark House” by Louise Erdrich (1999)
“The Book of Three” by Lloyd Alexander (1964)
“The Bossy Gallito / El Gallo De Bodas: A Traditional Cuban Folktale” by Lucia M. Gonzalez
“Bread and Jam for Frances” by Russell Hoban, illustrated by Lillian Hoban (1964)
“Bridge to Terabithia” by Katherine Paterson (1977)
“Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?” by Bill Martin Jr., illustrated by Eric Carle (1967)
“Caps for Sale” by Esphyr Slobodkina (1947)
“The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss (1957)
“Chains” by Laurie Halse Anderson (2008)
“A Chair For My Mother” by Vera B. Williams (1982)
“Charlotte’s Web” by E.B. White, illustrated by Garth Williams (1952)
“Chicka Chicka Boom Boom” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, illustrated by Lois Ehlert (1989)
“Corduroy” by Donald Freeman (1976)
“Curious George” by H.A. Rey (1941)
“Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus” by Mo Willems (2003)
“Esperanza Rising” by Pam Muoz Ryan (2000)
“Freight Train” by Donald Crews (1978)
“Frog and Toad Are Friends” by Arnold Lobel (1970)
“From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler” by E.L. Konigsburg (1967)
“George and Martha” by James Marshall (1972)
“The Giver” by Lois Lowry (1993)
“Go Away, Big Green Monster!” by Ed Emberley (1992)
“Go, Dog, Go!” by P.D. Eastman (1961)
“Goodnight Moon” by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Clement Hurd (1947)
“Grandfather’s Journey” by Allen Say (1993)
“The Graveyard Book” by Neil Gaiman (2008)
“Green Eggs and Ham” by Dr. Seuss (1960)
“Harold and the Purple Crayon” by Crockett Johnson (1955)
“Harriet the Spy” by Louise Fitzhugh (1964)
“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling (1997)
“Hatchet” by Gary Paulsen (1989)
“The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien (1937)
“Holes” by Louis Sachar (1998)
“Honey I Love, and Other Poems” by Eloise Greenfield; ill. by Leo& Diane Dillon
“Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaires Book of Greek Myths” by Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire (1962)
“The Invention of Hugo Cabret” by Brian Selznick (2007)
“Joseph Had a Little Overcoat” by Simms Taback (1999)
“Jumanji” by Chris Van Allsburg (1981)
“Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse” by Kevin Henkes (1996)
“The Lion and the Mouse” by Jerry Pinkney (2009)
“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by C.S. Lewis (1950)
#50 Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder, illustrated by Garth Williams (1932)
“The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1943)
“Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story From China” by Ed Young (1989)
“Madeline” by Ludwig Bemelmans (1939)
“Make Way for Ducklings” by Robert McCloskey (1941)
“Matilda” by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake (1988)
“Meet Danitra Brown” by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by Floyd Cooper (1994)
“Mike Mulligan’s Steam Shovel” by Virginia Lee Burton (1939)
“Millions of Cats” by Wanda Gag (1928)
“Miss Nelson is Missing!” by Harry Allard, illustrated by James Marshall (1977)
“Mr. Popper’s Penguins” by Richard and Florence Atwater; illustrated by Robert Lawson
“Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH” by Robert C. O’Brien (1971)
“Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters” by John Steptoe (1987)
“My Father’s Dragon” by Ruth Stiles Gannett, illustrated by Ruth Chrisman Gannett (1948)
“My Name is Yoon” by Helen Recorvits, illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska (2003)
“Olivia” by Ian Falconer (2000)
“One Crazy Summer” by Rita Williams Garcia (2010)
“The People Could Fly” by Virginia Hamilton, illustrated by Leo & Diane Dillon (2004)
“The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster, illustrated by Jules Feiffer (1961)
“Pierre” by Maurice Sendak (1962)
“Pink and Say” by Patricia Polacco (1994)
“Pippi Longstocking” by Astrid Lindgren (1950)
“Pyramid” by David Macaulay (1975)
“Ramona the Pest” by Beverly Cleary (1968)
“Rickshaw Girl” by Mitali Perkins, illustrated by Jamie Hogan (2007)
“Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry” by Mildred Taylor (1976)
“Rumpelstiltskin” by Paul O. Zelinsky (1986)
“A Sick Day for Amos McGee” by Philip Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead (2010)
“The Snowy Day” by Ezra Jack Keats (1962)
“Stone Soup” by Marcia Brown (1947)
“The Stories Julian Tells” by Ann Cameron, illustrated by Ann Strugnell (1981)
“The Story of Ferdinand” by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson (1936)
“Strega Nona” by Tomie de Paola (1975)
“Swimmy” by Leo Lionni (1963)
“Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” by William Steig (1969)
“Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing” by Judy Blume (1972)
“Tar Beach” by Faith Ringgold (1991)
“The Tales of Uncle Remus: The Adventures of Brer Rabbit” by Julius Lester, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney (1987)
“Ten Nine Eight” by Molly Bang (1983)
“Tomie dePaola’s Mother Goose” by Tomie dePaola (1985)
“The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” by Jon Scieszka, illustrated by Lane Smith (1989)
“Tuesday” by David Wiesner (1991)
“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle (1979)
“The Watsons Go to Birmingham, 1963” by Christopher Paul Curtis (1995)
“The Westing Game” by Ellen Raskin (1978)
“When You Reach Me” by Rebecca Stead (2009)
“Where Is the Green Sheep?” by Mem Fox, illustrated by Judy Horacek (2004)
“Where the Wild Things Are” by Maurice Sendak (1963)
“Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears” by Verna Aardema, illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon (1975)
“Winnie-the-Pooh” by A.A. Milne, illustrated by E.H. Shepard (1926)
“A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle (1962)

 

Click on the link to read Stunning Photographs of the Most Beautiful Libraries in the World

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Kids From Reading Books they Actually Enjoy

Click on the link to read The Classic Children’s Books they Tried to Ban

Click on the link to read How Spelling Mistakes can Turn a Compliment into Something Quite Different.

Click on the link to read Why Spelling is Important at Starbucks

Click on the link to read The Ability to Spell is a Prerequisite for Getting a Tattoo (Photos)

Click on the link to read This is What Happens When You Rely on Spell Check

 

Should a Children’s Book Celebrating Anti-Vaccination be Banned?

January 10, 2013

mel

I don’t believe in banning material just because I find it misleading or insulting. In a true democracy people should have the right to voice their opinion on a range of issues, whether they are right or wrong is immaterial:

A BOOK promoting the “marvellous” health benefits of potentially fatal measles should be taken off the shelves, doctors say.

Melanie’s Marvelous Measles is an anti-vaccination book aimed at children. It claims – despite evidence that measles can kill and cause brain damage – that it’s a “good thing” to have.

The Australian Medical Association said the suggestion was wrong and misleading and that publishers “should be ashamed of themselves”.

On the cover of the book ‘Melanie’ is happily playing in the garden and showing off a rash on her belly. In the story, she is home with measles and her friend Tina is worried – but her mother reassures her.

“Firstly Tina, measles don’t run and catch you or hurt you… for most children it is a good thing to get measles,” she says.

“Many wise people believe measles make the body stronger and more mature for the future.”

Tina then asks if she can go and catch measles from Melanie. “That sounds like a great idea,” her mother responds, and suggests some carrot juice and melon might help Melanie recover.

AMA President Steve Hambleton said only the “crazies” thought that it would be better to get a disease than be vaccinated.

“They should be ashamed of themselves,” he said.

Click on the link to read This New Craze Proves that Adults are Just Bigger Versions of Children


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