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Posts Tagged ‘Driving’

Father Teaches Young Sons a ‘Safe’ Way to Drive Dangerously (Video)

February 6, 2014

sam surace

I am all for father bonding time but teaching your underage children how to drive recklessly is not a good idea:

A REV-HEAD father who allows­ his seven and 12-year-old sons to hoon in a car says it is less dangerous than taking his kids fishing or hunting.

Victoria Police has blasted the Melton dad as “irresponsible and reckless” after the exploits were posted on the internet.

A defiant Sam Surace said he allowed his sons to drive cars by themselves on private property and to do burnouts.

“This is not bad parenting. It’s just a bit of fun,” he said.

“At least we are keeping it off the street.”

A video posted on ­YouTube shows Mr Surace’s son Brandon, 12, sitting in a car at his parents’ home’s driveway, smoking up the tyres until smoke blackens out the footage.

The video shows other males pushing the front bonnet down for more smoke.

Just moments earlier Brandon’s brother, Joshua, 7, also smoked up the tyres in the same car.

 

 

 

Click on the link to read Is Tiger Mom a Racist?

Click on the link to read 44 Things Parents Say to their Kids to Get them to Eat

Click on the link to read Should Teachers be Able to Tell People they Are Bad Parents?

Click on the link to read Loving Parents Are Allowed to Take Some Time Out

Click on the link to read How Life Changes When You Become a Parent (Video)

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The Courage of Overcoming Multiple Failures

February 20, 2013

drive

I suspect that this news article is intended to belittle a man who has failed his drivers test 107 times. Be that as it may, I prefer to look at it as an inspiring account of a person with incredible resilience and stamina who is determined to overturn an endless cycle of failures:

Many of us know someone who has struggled to pass their driving test. But spare a thought for the hapless learner who has set a record for failure.

The unnamed 28-year-old, from London, has flunked the car theory test 107 times and is still yet to pass.

They have so far spent £3,317 trying to pass the exam, which costs £31 a time. The test includes a 57-minute multiple choice exam, with a pass mark of 43 out of 50, and a hazard perception test with a pass mark of 44 out of 75.

Once you’ve passed both parts of the theory, there’s still the practical to overcome.

One determined 40-year-old logged a record number of practical driving tests – passing on his 37th attempt. The unnamed man, from Stoke-on-Trent, forked out at least £2,294 trying to pass – which could have paid for a reasonable second-hand car.

The practical test costs £62 to take on a weekday or £75 for a test on an evening, weekend or bank holiday.

An AA Driving School spokesman said: ‘This is an unusually high number of test attempts, but it is important to remember that everyone learns at their own pace. Their determination to pass highlights how important learning to drive is to most people.

‘It is a milestone that many people aspire to achieving because of the freedom and independence it brings.’

Let’s Teach 4-Year Olds How To Drive

December 20, 2011

Before you disagree with my proposal let me explain the rationale. At some point people need to know how to drive. We all want capable drivers on our roads, so what better time to teach them the intricacies of driving than when they are young.

Right?

Of course not.

Not only are 4-year olds too young to drive but they are also too young to learn other important life skills such as cyber safety. Why the Government expects kinder teachers to educate their young pupils on proper use of internet and the dangers of purchasing goods online beats me.

KINDERGARTENS will be urged to teach cyber safety to four-year-olds amid fears they could fall prey to online predators and bullies.

The Gillard Government will write to state education heads to encourage the take-up of cyber safety programs that teach children not to be mean online and keep their private information to themselves.

It comes amid revelations Victorian primary school children are “sexting” their friends and posting hate messages about their teachers on social networking sites.

A parliamentary committee report earlier this year recommended the Government consider the feasibility of helping deliver programs in preschools and kindergartens.

The Government yesterday accepted the recommendation in principle, but was waiting for a paper on cyber issues to be released in mid-2012 to give a detailed answer.

 In the meantime, it will encourage use of Australian Communication and Media Authority programs, including Cybersmart for Young Kids.

It features a bottlenose dolphin called Hector Protector and his friends teaching young children to keep “special information” private and tell mum or dad if they see anything scary or upsetting online.

It also encourages children to share passwords with their parents and to “be nice” to others.

And parents can download a “safety button” that children can click on to cover up anything upsetting they see online with a friendly picture.

Cyber safety expert Susan McLean said flexible, compulsory education should begin as soon as children switched on a computer, from kindergarten onwards.

“I’ve seen cyber bullying in grade 2. I’ve seen kids buying things on the internet at age seven after their parents have told them not to. That’s commonplace.”

Teaching kids skills too early is like not teaching them at all. I can’t see the value of making young children endure a program that will surely be too advanced for them and doesn’t relate to their present day lives.

Whats next? Teaching four-year olds how to work an electric drill?


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