Posts Tagged ‘Body Image’

Study Claims that Being Attractive can give you Better Grades

December 17, 2013

AM4NT6

Does anyone actually believe this happens?

Not being attractive as a teenager may have consequences far more reaching than a bruised ego and scribing the occasional bad poem.

A new study suggests that a pretty face can be a source of lifelong advantage – beginning at secondary school – according to a report prepared for the Council on Contemporary Families.

The report, ‘In School, Good Looks Help and Good Looks Hurt (But They Mostly Help)’ says that from high school onwards, people rate better-looking people higher in intelligence, personality, and potential for success — and this often creates a self-fulfilling prophecy.

The sociologists behind the study, Rachel Gordon (University of Illinois at Chicago) and Robert Crosnoe (University of Texas at Austin) also say women gain an eight per cent wage bonus for above-average looks and pay a four per cent wage penalty for below-average looks.

For men, the bonus is only four per cent. But the penalty for below-average looks is even higher than for women – a full 13 per cent.

Gordon and Crosnoe argue that ‘lookism’ creates inequalities comparable to those created by racism, sexism, and family background.

They wrote: ‘(In high school) youth rated as better looking get higher grades and are more likely to attain a college degree than their peers, setting the stage for better economic outcomes through adulthood.

 

Click on the link to read Woman Plans to Give ‘Fat Notes’ Instead of Candy to Trick or Treaters

Click on the link to read The Unique Challenges that Body Image Represents for Females

Click on the link to read An 8-Year-Old’s Take on Body Image

Click on the link to read A Father’s Advice to His Daughter About Beauty

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Telling Your Children they are Beautiful

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Woman Plans to Give ‘Fat Notes’ Instead of Candy to Trick or Treaters

October 31, 2013

 

fat

When will people start realising that the kids of today have had enough of the food associated guilt trips? I have never seen a child motivated to change their eating habits on the back of a public shaming, and I probably never will:

Children in a North Dakota neighborhood may be slated to get an awful surprise this Halloween: A local woman is reportedly planning to hand out “fat letters,” instead of candy, to kids she thinks are “moderately obese.”

Valley News Live reported a local Fargo woman called into Y-94 radio recently and revealed her plan to take on childhood obesity by handing out letters targeting trick-or-treaters whom she considers obese.

“I just want to send a message to the parents of kids that are really overweight,” she told the station. “I think it’s just really irresponsible of parents to send them out looking for free candy just ’cause all the other kids are doing it.”

Valley News Live obtained a copy of the letter, in which the woman, who is only identified as Cheryl, writes, in part:

You [sic] child is, in my opinion, moderately obese and should not be consuming sugar and treats to the extent of some children this Halloween season. My hope is that you will step up as a parent and ration candy this Halloween and not allow your child to continue these unhealthy eating habits.

 

Click on the link to read The Unique Challenges that Body Image Represents for Females

Click on the link to read An 8-Year-Old’s Take on Body Image

Click on the link to read A Father’s Advice to His Daughter About Beauty

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Telling Your Children they are Beautiful

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Click on the link to read Our Young Children Shouldn’t Even Know What a Diet Is?

The Unique Challenges that Body Image Represents for Females

October 12, 2013

 

 

Whilst I don’t like women vs men comparisons on universal areas of concern, I couldn’t help but be moved by this extremely personal and perceptive take on the pressures faced by women to maintain a certain figure.

 

Click on the link to read An 8-Year-Old’s Take on Body Image

Click on the link to read A Father’s Advice to His Daughter About Beauty

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Telling Your Children they are Beautiful

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Click on the link to read Our Young Children Shouldn’t Even Know What a Diet Is?

Click on the link to read Charity Pays for Teen’s Plastic Surgery to Help Stop Bullying

 

An 8-Year-Old’s Take on Body Image

July 15, 2013

What a wonderful self-assessment this young girl has produced:

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Jeniah, 8: “I like my body. I like my eyes because they help me see different things. I also like my hands because they help me write different things. I also like my feet because they help me walk and have fun. My name is Jeniah and I’m 8 years old!”

Click on the link to read A Father’s Advice to His Daughter About Beauty

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Telling Your Children they are Beautiful

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Click on the link to read Our Young Children Shouldn’t Even Know What a Diet Is?

Click on the link to read Charity Pays for Teen’s Plastic Surgery to Help Stop Bullying

Click on the link to read Most People Think This Woman is Fat

A Father’s Advice to His Daughter About Beauty

July 9, 2013

body

 

Father Chris Cook penned this wonderful letter to his young daughter Susan:

Dear Susan,

Right now your biggest concern in life is figuring out how to get around the child-proof locks on the kitchen cabinets, but one day you will deal with much bigger issues. Being a woman, one of these will be the problem of beauty and the emphasis put on it by nearly everyone in the world.

You will soon learn that the world is obsessed with beauty. As a woman, you will be bombarded with magazines, ads and commercials full of beautiful people telling you that you’re not pretty enough as you are. I wish I could tell you to ignore all of that, but it’s naïve of me to think you can go the rest of your life immune to the barrage of “beauty tips” thrown out by complete strangers.

There are lots of clichés out there about beauty. “Beauty is only skin deep,” “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” and so on, but as with most clichés, they say a lot but don’t mean much. So here is some real, practical advice about beauty.

The definition of beauty is intentionally vague. Find your own meaning for it. Don’t let somebody else define it for you.

From the day you were born, your mother and I have tried to tell you how beautiful you are. We have also tried to tell you how kind and caring you are. We value the last two much more than the first one.

One day somebody – it may even be one of your best friends – will tell you that something about you is ugly. Remember that just because one person says something negative about you doesn’t mean everyone in the world feels that way. That works both ways, though. If you think somebody else is ugly, keep your mouth shut. Just because you think so doesn’t mean somebody doesn’t think he or she is the most beautiful person in the world.

Also, whether you tell them to their face or not, calling someone ugly or fat reveals an ugliness in your soul that not even the prettiest smile can erase.

There may come a time when a boy breaks up with you and starts dating a girl you think is prettier than you. Don’t sweat it. People like that are never satisfied with what they have, and there’s no use trying to change them. Let him go chase the next best thing for the rest of his life.

Yes, beauty will get you certain things in life, mostly attention. Sometimes it’s not good attention, and sometimes all it does is call attention to what you glaringly lack in other areas. Like personality.

There has never been a perfect person. NEVER. Everybody has something about their appearance they want to change, and there are lots of people out there who claim to have a way to correct those things. All those people want is your money. Don’t part with your hard-earned cash just to buy a cure for what someone else labels an imperfection.

There’s nothing wrong with throwing on a nice outfit and doing whatever you feel like to make yourself feel pretty. Just make sure that what you see in the mirror is what you like and not what somebody else will like.

When you ask your husband/fiancé/boyfriend the question, “Do I look pretty?” his answer should always be, without hesitation, “Yes” or some form of that. If he says anything else, he probably isn’t right for you.

Do not end or begin a friendship based on that person’s looks or style. Do not think that surrounding yourself with popular, attractive people will make your life any easier. Befriending people of different backgrounds who have a range of outlooks and goals in life, however, will make you a well-rounded person capable of connecting with folks from all walks of life. That’s called a life skill.

Do not choose your role models based on looks, either. Or the fact that they’re on TV all the time. One of your mother’s role models is Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She is an amazing lady. Google her.

If you can get up every morning, look in the mirror and be happy with how you look, you will have achieved something that few people in the world ever will. If you can look at your friends and see what makes each of them beautiful, you will wind up with more friends than you can count.

You should also know that your mother and I are not immune to any of these things. We have both broken several of these rules at some point in our lives, and if you ask, we will tell you how stupid we were and how negatively those decisions affected us. Yes, we have learned and grown from those mistakes, but sometimes the lessons are very hard and have irreparable consequences. I have at least one friendship that ended because I was unable to overlook how that person chose to dress.

Our hope is that you never have to experience that. But remember – no matter what you look like, what clothes you wear, what color your hair is, whether you have the expensive new shoes everyone else does or the cheap imitations, we love you.

And for the record, your mom’s Jack Rogers aren’t real. They’re from Payless.

Love,

Dad

 

Click on the link to read The Call to Stop Telling Your Children they are Beautiful

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Click on the link to read Self-Esteem Crisis Even More Serious than the Obesity Crisis

We Must Allow Parents to Parent

July 8, 2013

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The proposal to ban parents from packing a lunch for their children is sheer lunacy. Whilst some packed lunches clearly contain too much sugar and fat, this is none of our business.

What’s next? The Government providing consequences for children just in case parents spoil their children by not setting parameters? The Government recruits personal trainers to switch off family television sets and take the children for a run?

And anyway, the lunchbox ban will be limited to lunch. What about breakfast? What about dinner? What about snacks and weekend restaurant visits and holidays?

Why can’t we just allow parents to parent without them being restricted, judged or lectured? Surely, a much better approach is to educate and work with parents rather than taking away their ability to do what they think is right for their own children:

Parents who make packed lunches for their children should stop, as it is making them fat, government food advisers warn.

Restaurateurs Henry Dimbleby and John Vincent argue school dinners are healthier than packed sandwiches, crisps and fizzy drinks, in a report to be published next week.

The report will also suggest that take-up must rise to at least 50 per cent to improve nutrition in meals and to save school dinners.

The pair’s school lunch plan, which will be launched this week alongside education secretary Michael Gove, also puts it down to head teachers to improve quality and take-up of school lunches.

‘A lot of heads will feel exasperated by this,’ Ian Bauckham, head of Bennett Memorial Diocesan school in Tunbridge Wells, Kent told The Sunday Times.

‘Many focus on a limited number of high priorities and we already have a big agenda to raise academic standards.’

As reported earlier this year, cooking lessons at school will become compulsory for children ages seven to 14 from September as the Government aims to ensure they can make up to 20 dishes before taking their GCSE exams.

And don’t get me started with compulsory cooking lessons at school. Remember when teachers were charged with the responsibility of helping students to read, write and become numerate? Boy, times have changed!

 

Click on the link to read my post on Tips For Parents on Packing a Healthy Lunch Box

Click on the link to read my post Exercising Wont Help Overweight Children: Study

Click on the link to read my post School Weigh-ins Are an Insult Rather Than a Solution

Click here to read my post ‘Considered Too Obese to Keep His Kids‘.

Click on the link to read Charity Pays for Teen’s Plastic Surgery to Help Stop Bullying

Click on the link to read my post, ‘Sparing Young Children the Affliction of Body Image‘.

The Call to Stop Telling Your Children they are Beautiful

June 10, 2013

 

Children, like adults have an innate need to feel attractive. It isn’t a manufactured one, it is completely natural. Sure, magazines and other mediums offer an unrealistic and extremely narrow version of beauty, but even without them, human beings would still obsess about their appearance.

That’s why advising parents not to make positive comments about their child’s looks is not constructive. It is based on the assumption that a comment on this issue, whether it be positive or negative, instills in the child an unhealthy message about the importance of looks in the real world. That is absolute baloney! In actual fact, those parents who choose to be silent on the issue risks that very consequence. Because after all, children are very perceptive. They know that parents compliment when there is something there to compliment and become silent when they have nothing positive to say on the matter. Children will just assume that their parents’ silence is due to their average appearance.

The key in life is to be moderate instead of extreme. Instead of limiting your compliments to be solely about looks and instead of saying nothing at all, how about making the child feel good about all aspects of their being such as their intellect, their sense of compassion, their individualism, their values …. and yes, even their appearance.

Click on the link to read School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

Click on the link to read Self-Esteem Crisis Even More Serious than the Obesity Crisis

Click on the link to read Our Young Children Shouldn’t Even Know What a Diet Is?

Click on the link to read Charity Pays for Teen’s Plastic Surgery to Help Stop Bullying

Click on the link to read Most People Think This Woman is Fat

Click on the link to read It’s Time to Change the Culture of the Classroom

Click on the link to read Sparing Young Children the Affliction of Body Image

School Official’s Solution to Harassed Teen: Get a Breast Reduction

January 19, 2013

reduction

Apparently a 13 year old who is being sexually harassed has no claim based on the size of her breasts:

A Missouri mother was shocked to hear an official at her daughter’s school district suggest that the 13-year-old get a breast reduction surgery to stop other classmates from bullying her.

Tammie Jackson, of Moline Acres in the suburbs of St Louis, said that her daughter, Gabrielle, has been sexually harassed by fellow classmates at Central Middle School because of her large breasts.

When the mother called the Riverview Gardens School District to complain about the bullying, she was shocked by the advice she has received.

According to Jackson, a  district representative told her that while her 13-year-old daughter could be transferred to another school, her breasts are so large that she will always be teased.

The woman then allegedly suggested a solution to the problem: that Gabrielle undergo a surgery to reduce her cup size.

‘It makes me feel like now you are telling me it’s my fault, it’s God’s fault the way he made her,’ Jackson told Fox 2.

If the allegations presented here are in fact true, the school official should be sacked immediately. No child should ever have to undergo surgery of any kind to ward off bullying behaviour. Schools ought to start to get their acts together and stop finding excuses for inexcusable behaviour.

Click on the link to read Self-Esteem Crisis Even More Serious than the Obesity Crisis

 

A Frightening Look at the Effects of Drugs (Pics)

January 13, 2013

Impressionable teens would benefit from studying these photos closely.

blondeThis pretty blonde’s face is transformed in just a year and a half

desperateThis user appears desperate and scared in the second mug shot, taken 2.5 years after the one of the left

tragicThis woman turns from fresh faced and attractive to gaunt and haggard thanks to drugs

fastIt takes this drug user just four months for his face to show the signs of addiction

skinnyThis man looks gaunt and sick after four years of taking hard drugs

sadA healthy-looking young woman looks decidedly worse in just eight months

scabsIn just six months, this woman develops large scabs on her face and looks like she is about to cry

no chanceThis man appears together in the left image but years of drugs have taken their toll on his face, right

shameThis woman looks happy and healthy in her first image but two and a half years on she looks decades older

Click on the link to read Trick, Treat or Cocaine?

Click on the link to read Hilarious Parenting Checklist

Click on the link to read Hilarious Video of Twin Toddlers Sleeping at the Table

Click on the link to read The Most Effective Anti-Smoking Ad Ever Conceived

Click on the link to read Potty Training at a Restaurant Table!

Click on the link to read Mother Shaves Numbers Into Quadruplets Heads So People Can Tell Them Apart

Overweight Doctors and Nurses ‘Should Undergo Stomach Stapling Surgery’

December 31, 2012

 

staple

The best rolemodels are the ones that act with integrity and treat others with respect. The best doctors and nurses take pride in what they do, give an excellent standard of care and are generally superb at what they do. I don’t care if they are fat, skinny, have a long nose or bushy eyebrows.

A recent report wants to point the finger at overweight medical professionals as if it’s easier for good doctors and nurses to stave off the difficulties of maintaining a trim physique. I don’t care what field you are in or what level of education you have maintaining a slim body is hard work and takes great discipline.

It beggars belief why a rolemodel must be slim before being kind, generous, caring and gratious:

Doctors and nurses who suffer from weight problems should be offered gastric surgery in order to retain credibility with patients on weight loss treatments, a report will say.

Overweight NHS staff ought to be given dietary advice and counselling as well as stomach stapling operations as they are setting a bad example for patients, the Royal College of Physicians said.

Over half of medical staff within NHS organisations are likely to be overweight, in accordance with statistics for the British population.

 

Click on the link to read Self-Esteem Crisis Even More Serious than the Obesity Crisis

Click on the link to read Our Young Children Shouldn’t Even Know What a Diet Is?

Click on the link to read Charity Pays for Teen’s Plastic Surgery to Help Stop Bullying

Click on the link to read Most People Think This Woman is Fat

Click on the link to read It’s Time to Change the Culture of the Classroom

Click on the link to read Sparing Young Children the Affliction of Body Image

 


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