Posts Tagged ‘Education Reform’

Questions to Improve Your Teaching Performance

January 24, 2016

teacher-questions

Courtesy of huffingtonpost.com:

 

  • What gets you excited about going to work at school every day?
  • How do you question old educational standards?
  • How do you make changes based on your educational beliefs?
  • When was the last time you taught a concept without using the textbook?
  • What excuses have you used to not make changes to your teaching or classroom?
  • What have you learned about yourself this past school year?
  • What changes in your teaching are you going to make based on what you learned from last year?
  • What would you do differently in your teaching if you had no state mandated accountability?
  • Can you remember a school lesson from your past?
  • Why do you remember that lesson so vividly?
  • Have you had a recent lesson that you think your students will never forget?
  • Is there any such thing as the perfect lesson?
  • How often do you make educational decisions purely with the students in mind?
  • Should you just do what is right for the students in your class regardless of consequences?
  • If you could mandate a book to be read by all teachers, what would it be?
  • Can you describe your teaching style in one small sentence?
  • What is your best teaching quality?
  • What are your personal teaching goals?
  • How would you describe educational freedom?
  • Do you love to teach? Why?

 

 

Click on the link to read Tricks That Work For Some Teachers But Don’t for Others (Video)

Click on the link to read Tips For Less Talking and Better Teaching

Click on the link to read What Type of Teacher Are You?

Click on the link to read The Making of a Great Teacher

4 Signs of a Great Teacher: Dr. Marvin Thompson

February 18, 2013

marvin

Courtesy of the star of the new docu-series, ‘Blackboard Wars‘:

1. The students in the classroom are doing more talking than the teacher. “In today’s classroom, learning should be inquiry based, not teacher directed,” says Dr. Thompson. “A good teacher sets the stage for students to investigate, inquire and create an engaging learning environment. A meaningful, class-wide discussion is a positive sign.”

2. He or she shares ideas with other teachers. “The sharing of ideas actually helps the teacher hone his or her skills and incorporate best practices from other teachers,” Dr. Thompson says. “Just as doctors consult one another on patients, teachers should engage in the same type of dialogue with one another.”

3. The teacher knows the intent of the curriculum. “Learning is not just about what the subject matter is,” says Dr. Thompson, “but [about] what the students are meant to master through the learning process. It is not enough to teach students how to multiply and divide, but to ensure they also understand the skills behind the lesson. If a student can’t relate what they are doing to real-world activities, it often limits the relevance of the lesson — which in turn diminishes engagement and interest.”

4. The teacher recognizes and rewards student effort, even for the small stuff. Says Dr. Thompson, “If students are doing something positive — and every child is capable of something positive — recognize them for their effort. Sometimes all a student needs is a little encouragement. A great teacher focuses on what his or her students are doing, even if they’re just showing up for class — because you never know what learning fears they have. You never know what challenges they are facing outside the classroom. A great teacher shows students that they matter. Sometimes, it’s as simple as that.”

 

Click on the link to read The Short Video You MUST Watch!

Click on the link to read Dying Teacher on Journey to Find Out if he Made a Difference

Click on the link to read School Shooting Showcases the Heroic Nature of Brilliant Teachers

Click on the link to read Meet the Armless Math Teacher

Click on the link to read The Case of a Teacher Suspended for Showing Integrity

Click on the link to read Teaching is Worth It!

The Teacher Blame Game Isn’t Fair

October 28, 2011

It seems to be more fashionable than ever to knock teachers.  Teachers are being dubbed as lazy and inept.

In truth it is easy to criticise teachers but very hard to be one.

We need more articles like this one by Patricia McGuire to defend teachers and set the record straight.

Yes, teachers should certainly be held accountable for excellence in teaching and for measurable results in the progress their students make each day. Teachers are on the front line of student learning assessment, since they really do know better than anyone else what makes a child successful or lackadaisical, engaged or detached in class. Standardized tests rarely measure the real progress that teachers make with some of the most challenging pupils whose learning styles are far off the normed curves.

The current fashion in education reform treats teachers as lazy slugs who care little about whether their students are learning anything. The assumption behind using standardized testing for teacher evaluation is that the only way to make teachers care about learning is to embarrass them publicly when their students do not perform according to someone else’s idea of norms. This assumption is what is truly preposterous!

For teachers who choose to devote their life’s work to some of the most difficult classrooms in America, such as here in the District of Columbia, the testing imperative becomes a monumental disincentive to stay in the classroom for any length of time, since the opportunities for sustained superior results on standardized tests are rare, while the risks of frequent subpar results are very high. It’s no secret that the widely-hailed Teach for America program has ingrained two-year turnover in its teaching corps. TFA teachers rarely stay to wrestle through the down years, which are frequent among students in marginalized communities.

Governments are so busy trying to find a negatively geared incentive for teachers and a scale that compares their effectiveness that they have lost sight of the most important pieces of the Education reform puzzle:

1.  Revolutionise teacher training programs to focus on the practical instead of the theoretical.

2. Have measures in place that allow all teachers (especially new teachers) the support they need.

3.  Spend more time critiquing schools with questionable cultures of bullying and harrasment.  Give these school’s the support they need to better handle their affairs.


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