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Posts Tagged ‘Teachers Stress’

Teachers Have to Maintain Their Self-Control

November 18, 2015

Diamonique-Singleton

Nobody is diminishing the stress and emotional trauma inflicted on many teachers throughout their working day. The bullying, name calling, pushing and disrespect can make a teacher despondent and at times on the edge.

The challenge is to find a way to stay on that edge, without losing it altogether. Because, as the footage below clearly shows, it is not a good look when teachers take the bait and lose all sense of reality and professionalism.

As hard as it is we must find a way to keep our composure and avoid a scene.

Easier said than done, I know.

 

 

 

Click on the link to read Teachers Confess Their Sins

Click on the link to read Sometimes You Don’t Even Realise That You Have Impacted a Student

Click on the link to read Teachers Should be Able to File a Complaint Against Complaint Addicted Parents

Click on the link to read Where Are All the Teachers Who Promote Teaching as a Career?

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Where Are All the Teachers Who Promote Teaching as a Career?

October 1, 2014

 

I love being a teacher and I absolutely recommend it to anyone considering it as a career choice. It really bothers me that we hear many teachers advise against teaching. Even though these teachers have every right to be heard, and often make good points, their views tend not to be counterbalanced by those who adore what they do.

 

Click on the link to read 20 Primary School Students a Day Sent Home for Violence Against a Teacher

Click on the link to read The Difficult Challenge that is Starting Your Teaching Career

Click on the link to read Getting Your Teacher Fired Has Become a Popular Sport

Click on the link to read Tips for Dealing With Negative Feedback

Click on the link to read Guess What Percentage of Teachers Considered Quitting this Year

20 Primary School Students a Day Sent Home for Violence Against a Teacher

September 1, 2014

attackWhat are the lawmakers doing to protect teachers from their students and deter violent children from attacking their teachers?

Increasing numbers of children in the first years of primary school are being suspended for attacking their teachers, shocking statistics show.

More than 4,000 children aged four to seven were sent home for violence against those teaching them last year, according to most recent figures.

Suspensions for attacks on teachers of Reception, Year One and Year Two classes rose by nearly 50 per cent in the last five years – with 20 pupils now being sent home every day over the issue.

In the 2008/2009 school year, just over 2,880 four to seven-year-olds were sent home for attacking their teacher – but that had jumped to 4,210 youngsters by 2012/13.

The figures, published by The Sun, lay bare the increasingly violent classrooms of England and Wales’ youngest schoolchildren.

 

Click on the link to read The Difficult Challenge that is Starting Your Teaching Career

Click on the link to read Getting Your Teacher Fired Has Become a Popular Sport

Getting Your Teacher Fired Has Become a Popular Sport

March 26, 2014

fired

There is an utterly distasteful YouTube trend emerging featuring young children filming confessions on how they bullied, harassed and campaigned against their teacher. In some videos they even confess to deliberately lying in order to get them fired.

The video below is just one of many examples:

 

Not everyone can be a teacher’s pet, but some students who think their instructor doesn’t like them are saying they’ve fabricated stories to get them fired.

KRIV-TV out of Houston recently conducted an investigation and found a disturbing number of YouTube videos with students describing what they’ve done to get teachers sacked.

“So, we’re going to tell you guys about how we got our first-grade teacher fired,” a young boy in a video posted to YouTube a year ago said.

“Wanna share the story?” he continued to his friend.

“What first happened is we got the suckiest teacher ever,” the other boy said. “I forgot her name … but she’s gone.”

The boys went on to describe a discipline system the teacher had in place. It was a common tactic that included a warning system, a small writing punishment for minor offenses all the way up to getting sent to the principal’s office.

“Anyway, how we got her fired … we just kept going to the principal’s office and telling her [the teacher] was harassing us,” one of the boys said, adding that they eventually told their parents as well at which point formal reports were filed. They also described having hidden cameras on their clothes to capture the alleged harassment.

“We got her pretty good but they said we didn’t show that much,” the boy said.

So, they went on to get people to sign a petition — about 20 students — to have the teacher ousted.

“We gave her a lot for her to handle,” the boys said wondering if they really got her fired or if she quit.

Watch the students talking about the efforts they went through to have the teacher leave:

 

 

 

Click on the link to read Tips for Dealing With Negative Feedback

Click on the link to read Guess What Percentage of Teachers Considered Quitting this Year

Click on the link to read The Classroom Shouldn’t be a War Zone for Our Teachers

Click on the link to read Remember When Teachers Were Shown Respect? (Video)

Click on the link to read If You Think Teaching is so Easy You Should Try it for Yourself

Tips for Dealing With Negative Feedback

March 20, 2014

 

stress

Nobody likes being criticised and some negative comments hits very hard. We have all struggled to rebound from scathing criticism in the post, so it’s good to have sites like ukedchat.com to refer to when trying to manage such a situation:

  • One major way to deal with judgements is to remember that it is not necessarily a definition of who you are as a person; such opinions do not define you as a person, but are there as a snapshot of the work you do, and if managed carefully, a way for you to improve the way you teach.
  • Remember how such judgements make you feel, and consider this when making judgements yourself (to pupils and/or colleagues) – don’t be the hater. Don’t be the person who tears down someone else’s hard work. The world needs more people who contribute their gifts and share their work and ideas. Working up the courage to do that can be tough. Support the people who display that courage.
  • If you’re dealing with criticism, then don’t let the wall keep you from seeing the road. Focus on the path ahead. For example, when planning a trip, you may explore the online reviews from other travellers. Rationally, you will ignore the top and bottom 10% of the reviews and focus on those in the middle – they are the ones you pay attention to – consider this with the you receive.
  • If you choose to respond to the haters, then surprise them with kindness. You might just win a new fan while you’re at it.
  • Finally, and most importantly, make the choices that are right for you. People will criticise you either way – It’s human nature.
  • Be aware of Passive Aggressive behaviours. They can be destructive.

 

Click on the link to read Guess What Percentage of Teachers Considered Quitting this Year

Click on the link to read The Classroom Shouldn’t be a War Zone for Our Teachers

Click on the link to read Remember When Teachers Were Shown Respect? (Video)

Click on the link to read If You Think Teaching is so Easy You Should Try it for Yourself

Click on the link to read Teachers are Extremely Vulnerable to False Accusations

Guess What Percentage of Teachers Considered Quitting this Year

December 22, 2013

gove

What percentage of British teachers considered quitting their job this year?

10%?

Not even close!

25%?

Keep on going.

35%?

You’re not even trying.

How about 45?

Keep going.

50%?

Correct! According to the Teaching union NASUWT, almost half the teachers in England were considering giving their jobs away. Whilst I don’t take union figures as gospel, the survey results point to two very severe problems.

  • Teachers are not happy. Increased Government funding and standardized testing are not going to sufficiently impact student performance when the most important piece in the puzzle, the teacher, are not committed to seeing the year out. A teacher that isn’t happy is more than an impediment to learning – it is a fatal blow.
  • The latest trend in education policy is to put more pressure on teachers. Paperwork has become ridiculously onerous, constant changes to curriculum have left teachers in a tailspin, the deterioration of classroom behaviour has left many teachers suffering undue stress and assessments by government, school administration, peers, parents and even students have made teaching one of the most critiqued professions around.

My experience with teachers is that they join the profession largely from a desire to make a difference. The fact that so many enter the job with idealism and passion that becomes eroded so quickly is cause for great alarm.

From all the ideas and methodologies surfacing in education there seems to be one crucial policy area that continues to be avoided:

What policies can we put in place to support teachers rather than judge them, to assist them rather than to overwhelm and suffocate them?

If public policy doesn’t show concern for teachers, it stands to reason that many teachers wont get the job done.

Click on the link to read The Classroom Shouldn’t be a War Zone for Our Teachers

Click on the link to read Remember When Teachers Were Shown Respect? (Video)

Click on the link to read If You Think Teaching is so Easy You Should Try it for Yourself

Click on the link to read Teachers are Extremely Vulnerable to False Accusations
Click on the link to read Top 10 Ways of Dealing with Teacher Burnout

Click on the link to read Tips For Teachers for Managing Stress

The Classroom Shouldn’t be a War Zone for Our Teachers

December 15, 2013

 

up

Yesterday I posted a distressing video showing a teacher being bullied and humiliated by a gang of students. Unfortunately, this behaviour has become more frequent by the year and the perpetrators are getting younger too:

Children as young as four have violently attacked their teachers, new figures suggest.

In one instance, a nursery school teacher was reportedly smacked, kicked and headbutted by a child in Walsall, West Midlands.

Elsewhere, it is claimed a pupil punched and headbutted a staff member after grabbing them by the neck in Houndslow, West London.

One teacher in Derby was stabbed in the arm with a pencil, according to reports.

Teachers across the country were scratched kicked and even bitten by children they were attempting to control, The Sun on Sunday has reported.

Figures published by the newspaper suggested that children as young as four have violently assaulted teachers 21,000 times in the past two years.

On average, there are 55 assaults in school per day.

In the 2011/12 academic year there were 10,000 attacks in classrooms while in 2012/13 there were 10,750.

The figures were obtained from 70 local authorities in England and Wales by the newspaper via a Freedom of Information Act.

A Department for Education spokesman said: ‘Teachers have more power than ever to maintain discipline.’
Click on the link to read Remember When Teachers Were Shown Respect? (Video)

Click on the link to read If You Think Teaching is so Easy You Should Try it for Yourself

Click on the link to read Tips For Teachers for Managing Stress

Click on the link to read I Also Had a Student Hold a Toy Gun to my Face

If You Think Teaching is so Easy You Should Try it for Yourself

October 9, 2013

 

 

help

 

Yes, it’s true, the holidays are good and the hours can be flexible, but teaching is not an easy profession. I adore teaching, but even on a good day I come home absolutely exhausted. And it’s not as if my day stops when I get home. Marking, planning and reporting duties often have me working deep into the night.

The same parents that think teaching is not very hard, openly complain about how tiring their child’s birthday party was to manage. They freely talk about the noise levels, the repeated requests for them to be quiet and the tears when games are lost and feelings are hurt.

Now picture this: You are hosting a birthday party every single day for a year. Now you know what it can be like to teach a class!

I am very lucky. My natural love for teaching energises me and gives me the adrenaline I need to get through the day with my smile intact. But I have experienced enough stress and challenges in my time to completely sympathise with the overwhelming number of teachers experiencing burnout:

More than one in four new teachers are suffering from ”emotional exhaustion” and almost burnt out soon after starting their careers, according to a Monash University study.

The reasons offered include a lack of administrative support, onerous compliance measures and much tougher emotional conditions than they expected to face, particularly in economically depressed areas.

“We could go within five kilometres of this university and find classroom environments where some teachers would be experiencing forms of post-traumatic stress as a result of the sorts of things they deal with on a daily basis – where the social dimension of their work is a big, big ask,” Associate Professor Paul Richardson said. ”People would be shocked.”

He and Associate Professor Helen Watt made their findings from surveys of 612 primary and secondary teachers. They were first surveyed in 2002 as they enrolled in teacher education at universities in Victoria and NSW.

”I would never have thought 27 per cent would be on a path to burnout or worn out already,” Dr Richardson said. Dr Watt described those affected as ”a very dangerous group”.

“They report much greater negativity in their interaction with students,” she said, ”such as using sarcasm, aggression, responding negatively to mistakes. They were there [originally] for reasons such as wanting to enhance social equity, making a contribution to society, or having a personal interest in teaching and working with youth,” she said.

Yet the latest results of the FIT-Choice (Factors Influencing Teaching) project indicate low morale is all too common among this sample.

And the most positively motivated teaching students – those who initially planned to stay in teaching the longest – suffered the greatest drop in confidence and satisfaction once they started working.

In Victoria, new teachers have orientation days, mentoring arrangements and even “buddy” programs to help them feel at home in their first weeks on the job.

“But it would appear most of these measures are ad hoc,” said Andrea Gallant, a senior lecturer and education researcher at Deakin University.

Dr Gallant is tracking the attrition rate among beginning teachers – a statistic made difficult to pin down because teachers often remain registered after leaving the profession. The Education Department puts the attrition rate for teachers under 30 at 3 per cent. “We would estimate the rate of attrition to be probably 50 per cent,” Dr Gallant said. She recently completed a small case study interviewing high-performing teaching graduates who left the profession within a few years, to find out why.

“They were keen to introduce new practices, which were not always widely accepted by peers. They were supported in their first year and isolated in their second year,” Dr Gallant said. ”And often they’re given the toughest classes.”

Meredith Peace, Victorian branch president of the Australian Education Union, said schools were not given enough support to implement structured peer-to-peer programs. “Good mentoring requires time,” she said.

Click on the link to read Teachers are Extremely Vulnerable to False Accusations
Click on the link to read Top 10 Ways of Dealing with Teacher Burnout

Tips For Teachers for Managing Stress

July 8, 2013

 

stress

 

Stress has become an unavoidable part of a teacher’s life. The demands on a teacher are growing every year and the conditions are far harder than ever before. Psychologist Marc Smith gives some useful tips to teachers for managing stress:

Despite much discussion concerning the nature of workplace stress, our jobs are getting more and not less stressful. While stress certainly isn’t unique to the teaching profession, working in schools does throw up a number of situations that are unique to education while the current climate of uncertainty and criticism further undermines the professionalism and confidence of many hard working teachers. Ofsted inspections, changes to pay and conditions and new appraisal systems all add to the feeling that we are far from in control. Identifying those things that we can control and those that we cannot could help to prevent daily hassles from becoming major problems; but we can’t do it on our own.

Stress is a natural biological response and back in the day when wild animals roamed freely and early humans spent much of their time hunting and gathering the body’s response to stress was vital for our survival. Stress allows our biological system to prepare itself to do something – either attack (fight) or run away (flight). Acute stress represents that immediate panic which drives the fight or flight response but if this stress continues we begin to suffer from a more chronic condition, this can not only impact on us psychologically but can also lower our immune system, making us more vulnerable to physical illness.

Psychologically, the stress we feel is often based on our individual perception of a situation and this is why some people appear to suffer more than others. American psychologist Julian Rotter describes this as our ‘locus of control’ or the extent to which an individual feels that they have control over a situation. Locus of control can be internal, in that we believe we have control over our lives, or external, where we believe that the environment controls events. Realistically most of us fall between these two dimensions but we may favour a particular one. Unfortunately, our locus of control is very difficult to change because it probably developed through a combination of genetics and early socialisation.

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Support Teachers Before they Have a ‘Meltdown’

March 5, 2013

chalk

Teacher meltdowns are often ugly and they are toxic in a school environment. When they occur, inevitably, disciplinary action must be taken to ensure that the offense doesn’t happen again.

Whilst a teacher doesn’t have an excuse when they act unprofessionally, it is vital that more support and greater welfare provisions are available for what is a highly stressful and sometimes quite unforgiving occupation.

The teacher that wrote an intimidating message on the chalkboard of his classroom deserves to be severely punished for his inexcusable actions. However, with 28 years of service, I only wish he would have been able to seek help instead of  feeling the need to vent in such a way:

A northwest Indiana teacher is the subject of a police probe over a threatening message he scrawled on the chalkboard of his classroom.

According to ABC Chicago, the teacher at Edison Junior-Senior High School in Lake Station, Ind., wrote the following message on his chalkboard following after he had a “meltdown” during his sixth-period personal finance class last week:

A.) You are idiots!!!!!!!!B.) The guns are loaded!!!

C.) Care to try me???????

Students took a photo of the message and the image was circulated on social media, prompting school administrators to take action. The teacher was told to leave the school last Friday morning while an investigation into the apparent threat is completed.

Both police and the Lake County prosecutor’s office are working on the matter, according to Fox Chicago, and charges may yet be filed against the teacher.

According to CBS Chicago, the school sent out a district-wide call to students’ parents assuring them that “your student was never in danger” and that “the staff member is currently not in school.”

The teacher, a 28-year veteran of the school, has never been disciplined before, according to ABC.

 

Click on the link to read I Also Had a Student Hold a Toy Gun to my Face

Click on the link to read Who is Going to Stand Up For Bullied Teachers?

Click on the link to read 12 Tips for Managing Time in the Classroom

Click on the link to read If Teachers Were Paid More I Wouldn’t Have Become One

Click on the link to read Different Professions, Same Experiences

Click on the link to read Our Pay Isn’t the Problem


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