Posts Tagged ‘bipolar disorder’

11 Mental Illness Myths

March 29, 2014

mental illness

Courtesy of The Huffington Post:

 

You Are Not Sick
MYTH: Bipolar disorder just means mood swings
FACT: Bipolar disorder is an illness with severe mood swings. Often, bipolar can interfere with one’s daily functioning, and sometimes can even lead to suicide, according to Dr. Prakash Masand, a psychiatrist and president of Global Medical Education.

Am I Cured?
MYTH: Once you feel better you can stop taking your medication
FACT: Almost all patients with psychiatric illness need maintenance treatment for a while, even if they start “feeling better.” Masand says this is to prevent relapses and recurrences, similar to diabetes and heart disease patients.

Your Relationship Is To Blame
MYTH: Psychiatric illness is a result of bad relationships
FACT: All psychiatric illnesses have a genetic component and an environmental component, Masand says. A bad relationship, for example, is only one of several factors.

You Can’t Handle It
MYTH: Psychiatric illnesses are due to weak character or inadequate coping skills
FACT: Psychiatric illnesses are medical illnesses with several origins like all other illnesses, Masand says. Just because you cry easily or can’t cope with personal problems, it doesn’t make you weak or more likely to be mentally ill.

It Will Go Away
MYTH: Depression is just sadness that will go away
FACT: Depression is a serious medical illness with morbidity and mortality, Masand says. Not all people show obvious signs of being depressed either. While some seek medication or go to therapy to cope, Masand says others try exercise, yoga or meditation. On the flip side, if someone is often sad or emotional, it doesn’t necessarily mean they are depressed.

You Won’t Have A ‘Normal’ Life
MYTH: Once you have depression or bipolar disorder, you will never achieve your full potential or live a ‘normal’ life
FACT: Some of the most successful people in various fields have had depression or bipolar disorder, including Isaac Newton, Beethoven, Brad Pitt and Oprah Winfrey, Masand says. People who go through a mental illness may also feel they can’t ever get back to a “normal life.” This is another myth. Someone with a mental illness can still function, go to work, raise a family or perform any other task.

Suicide Isn’t Really A Big Problem
MYTH: Suicide is not a big problem in our society
FACT: You may not know someone who has committed suicide, but this doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. In 2009, for example, suicide accounted for 3,890 deaths in Canada among both genders, and according to Statistics Canada, mental illness is the most important risk factor. In the U.S., Masand says suicide was the 10th leading cause of death in 2007.

If You Seek Help, You Are Weak
MYTH: Treatment for psychiatric illness is a cop-out for weak people
FACT: Treatment is necessary for psychiatric illnesses like it is for other medical illnesses, such as diabetes and heart disease, Masand says. This myth is also commonly believed because finding help or telling people close to you about your illnesses can also lead to shaming and embarrassment.

They Are Just ‘Crazy’
MYTH: All patients with schizophrenia are dangerous
FACT: If you’ve ever seen schizophrenia or mental health portrayed in mainstream media, you might just think everyone who is mentally ill is “crazy.” Only a small proportion of patients with schizophrenia can be violent and this is usually because they are untreated, Masand says.

Just Get Over It
MYTH: Talk therapy is just whining
FACT: Several types of talk therapy, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, can be just as effective as medication in treating depression and anxiety disorders.

 

Click on the link to read Discussing Mental Illness with Children

Doctors Create a New Normal by Over-Prescribing Drugs

June 10, 2012

Some doctors seem to relish the opportunity to prescribe psychiatric drugs. After all, from the perspective of a passive observer, prescriptions of such medication are becoming all too frequent. I wonder if it will get to the stage when those not on drugs will feel left out and marginalised because of it:

PRESCRIPTIONS of antipsychotic drugs given to children have doubled in only five years, data obtained under freedom of information laws shows.

Antidepressant prescriptions have also risen, bucking international trends to reduce the use of the drugs after they were linked to children developing suicidal thoughts.

A psychiatry professor at the University of Adelaide, Jon Jureidini, said he was concerned antidepressant medication use was increasing despite warnings about suicide risks.

He said antidepressants should almost never be used in children.

After the US drug regulator issued a warning about the risk of suicide in children and teenagers taking antidepressants, there was a 58 per cent drop in the use of the drugs.

Yet between 2007 and 2011 in Australia antidepressant prescriptions increased from nearly 22 prescriptions per 1000 children aged below 16 to nearly 27, data provided to the Herald by the Department of Human Services under freedom of information laws shows.

Last year there were about 14 antipsychotic prescriptions for every 1000 children, compared with seven in 2007.

Professor Jureidini said it was likely the increase in the prescription of antipsychotics could be explained by doctors prescribing the drugs for behavioural problems, or by conditions such as personality disorder being reclassified as bipolar disorder and then treated with antipsychotics.

”There has been a very significant increase in the prescription of antipsychotic drugs and we can be pretty confident there has not been an increase in psychosis,” he said.

Antipsychotics are recommended for the treatment of children with conditions such as bipolar disorder, in some cases. National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines say doctors can consider prescribing an antidepressant for childhood depression in the short term, where psychological therapy has not been effective or has been refused.

Professor Jureidini said more monitoring of the drugs and their side effects was needed, along with training for GPs on non-pharmacological treatments.

A clinical adviser to the National Prescribing Service, Philippa Binns, said those who were prescribing antipsychotics and antidepressants to children should be specialists in children’s psychiatric problems.

I plead to doctors worldwide to please resist from writing a prescription for drugs unless you have tried all  other options which have turned out to be unsuccessful.


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