Calls To Allow Teachers To Use “Reasonable Force” on Students

Students should never be physically disciplined under any circumstances.  Whilst a majority of teachers care very much for the wellbeing of their students, there are teachers around who are more concerned with quiet compliant classrooms than the needs of their pupils.  Giving these teachers the opportunity to use force is asking for trouble.

Telegraph journalist, Bertie O’Brien disagrees:

Here’s hoping that the Government’s plans to allow teachers to use “reasonable force” to control disorderly pupils in the classroom is the beginning of a turnaround in our society. The culture of child protectionism – developed in tandem with health and safety and political correctness – is preventing children from entering the professional world as well-developed adults.

It’s about time teachers were lawfully allowed to regain control over pupils. Let’s get back to the purpose of being young: becoming a well-rounded adult, not having a good laugh or being “empowered”. Young people have to learn to lose out sometimes, and to follow orders. It is necessary that they learn to live in a world which won’t continue to worship them when they do grow up.

What does “reasonable force” mean anyway?  What is reasonable for one teacher may not be reasonable for other sections of society.

The argument that corporal punishment will help students become well-rounded adults is plain wrong.  Teachers help their students become well-rounded by understanding, connecting and appreciating their students, by setting a good example and high but fair expectations, imposing fair and consistent consequences, making their lessons engaging, fostering their students’ talents, creativity, critical thinking and independence as well as offering support and guidance.

I bet any teacher wishing to inflict corporal punishment on their students has in fact failed their students.  I would encourage them to spend less time worrying about using reasonable force and instead concentrate on their own performance.

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