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Tips for Making a Parent-Teacher Relationship Work

parent-teacher-cartoonThe strength of the parent-teacher relationship is absolutely pivotal to achieving in the classroom. Below are some insightful tips by teacher Toby Sorge:

 

* Think of what the end goal is. Teachers can tell when the focus is on a specific grade or assessment, whether the communication is by email, phone call or in person. Giving authentic feedback and grading assessments is not an easy task, but remember that the grade that was earned is now in the past.

* Work with the teacher to create a plan. This plan should focus on student engagement and growth. This may take time, so it’s important to trust the process. Maintain open lines of communication, so if you have questions about your role, you can ask and have them answered.

* Trust is one of the core values when it comes to fostering a successful relationship. Trust that the teacher knows what’s best for each student and how to get there.

* Trusting the process of learning is also important. True learning and deep engagement do not happen with one quiz, test or writing assignment. They take time.

* Make sure you work with teachers and not against them. Instead of coming in with an agenda, work on creating a plan with the teacher. The plan should focus on the development, practice and reinforcement of skills.

* Offer suggestions but also take advice. Discussing with teachers ways for students to succeed will help everyone fully understand children and what their capabilities are.

 

Click on the link to read Sometimes It’s Worth Risking a Fight With a Parent

Click on the link to read 10 Tips for Dealing With Difficult Parents

Click on the link to read 5 Helpful Tips for a Better Parent-Teacher Conference

Click on the link to read The Cafeteria Controversy

Click on the link to read Insensitive ‘Parent Bashers’ Take Aim at Grieving Colorado Parents

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2 Responses to “Tips for Making a Parent-Teacher Relationship Work”

  1. Jason Preater Says:

    Oh dear, those ideas all seem quite horrible to me! How about “have a conversation with the parent, listening to their point of view with respect. Think about what is best for the child in its unique context. Try to dissuade parents from focussing exclusively on grades, quizzes and tests because you don’t get a second chance at being a parent and messing up your child’s life by pver-schooling her is a crime. Never talk about how difficult your job is grading papers because that is an open admission that you have become nothing more than a functionary and have nothing real to say to a businessman, entrepreneur or blue-collar worker.

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