Advertisements

Education New Year’s Resolutions 2014

2014

With resolutions abounding as the new year arrives, I think it’s apt for our education system to undertake some resolutions of its own:

  1. Work Harder to Manage Cyberbullying Issues – Schools seem more interested in covering themselves legally than actually fixing a problem. Because cyberbullying usually happens off premises, the argument has been that it is a parental issue rather than a school issue. This is an insensitive approach. Schools, administrators and teachers must see themselves as crucial stakeholders in dealing with this problem. The welfare of their students rely on a multi-faceted approach.
  2. Stop Changing the Curriculum – In a bid to be seen to be doing something effective to improve student results, politicians continually change the curriculum so that they can boast about how they overhauled an ineffective syllabus.  In the last ten years I have seen 4 changes of curriculum, each of them decidedly more complicated and inferior to the one being replaced. This makes us teachers dizzy, costs the tax payers a fortune and achieves nothing for the student. We must resolve to put a moratorium on any changes to the curriculum. I don’t want even a comma or full stop tampered with for at least a decade.
  3. Respect Teachers’ Time – Even before the school year starts I have to submit Yearly Planners for literacy and numeracy, term planners for literacy numeracy and science, integrated planners covering my overriding topic of inquiry and weekly planners for maths and literacy covering my lesson for the first week. Then I need to continue the weekly planners and term planners throughout the year. These planners are incredibly detailed and onerous. They simply take a disproportionate amount of time. To deliver fun, engaging lessons, I need to spend less time on the paperwork. It is becoming fashionable for teachers to copy/paste their planners from specially made internet subscriptions sites that contain lessons covering the curriculum. Whilst this saves time, the lessons on these sites are often excruciatingly boring for the students. The best way to get teachers to teach in a fresh manner is to keep them fresh by reducing the paperwork.
  4. Make Politicians Accountable by Not Accepting Their Spin – Lazy politicians like to brag about how much money they are pumping into the system or how they have changed the curriculum, when neither is a major determinant in student performance. Politicians should start to focus on the major areas requiring change such as improving teacher training quality, support for new teachers, reducing teacher stress and helping schools achieve better welfare outcomes for their students.  In fairness to the current Federal minister, he has spoken about some of these matters. Let’s hope he is is able to deliver.

Click on the link to read Eight Fundamentals that Every Student Deserves

Click on the link to read 21 Reasons to Become a Teacher

Click on the link to read  25 Amusing Signs You Might Be a 21st Century Teacher

Click on the link to read  20 Questions Teachers Should Be Asking Themselves

Click on the link to read School Official Allegedly told a Teacher to Train her Breasts to not Make Milk at Work

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “Education New Year’s Resolutions 2014”

  1. John Tapscott Says:

    1. Cyberbullying, whether by initiation or by participation should result in loss of all internet privileges for a fixed period of time. Policing it is another issue.

    2. Return management of curriculum to teachers. Curriculum ought to be mandated only to the extent of general content. e.g. Children learn to read and write in the years K-2; that general. Teachers need to be responsible for selection of lesson material according to the cognitive capacities of their students.

    3. Abolish paperwork associated with compliance issues. A teacher needs a timetable and a program, both designed with the current needs of students in mind. Integral to the program needs to be a means of assessing whether students have mastered concepts, skills and knowledge covered in the program. There is no need for mass testing. Teachers exist for students not for the dictates of a broken system.

    4. Agreed. Except I don’t think the current minister has much of an idea. It’s one thing to speak about such matters. Knowing what to do about them is another matter. Every time I have written to a state or federal minister, if my letter is not altogether ignored the response is usually a regurgitation of canned spin without actually answering any of the issues raised.

    • Michael G. Says:

      I decided to bypass the Minister and write to his deputy, the Parliamentary secretary, thinking I might get a less “spun” response. Nope! Same old spin again!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: