Political Correctness is a Failed Philosophy

For all its good intentions, I am not a fan of political correctness.  My school just invested in new blinds for the classrooms, only weeks before a dictate from the Education Department stipulating how many bolts must be present in classroom blinds.  My school now has to find the money to put extra bolts in, even though the current setup is more than sufficient.  Whilst I agree that students welfare and safety is of vital importance, sometimes bureaucracy goes too far.

In the past few months, I have written numerous posts about political correctness gone wrong. I wrote of a farcical primary school law that banned young children from hugging.  Then there was the school that banned football in the playground and another that banned socialising in groups bigger than three.  These are examples of political correctness working against the students, not for the students.

It was so good to hear the British Prime Minister speak out against the bureaucracy trying to ban street parties in honour of Prince William and Kate Middleton wedding.

If only our Education Minister had the presence of mind to do the same.

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4 Responses to “Political Correctness is a Failed Philosophy”

  1. criticalconsciousness Says:

    In Queensland three was a crowd under Bjelke Petersen. Was he PC?

  2. John Tapscott Says:

    Everybody calls traffic cones “witches’ hats”. I once worked in a school that prohibited the term. Political correctness alters the social climate, and that is its purpose. “Islam is a religion of peace” is another politically correct statement despite all the glaring evidence to the contrary. No doubt there are many peace loving Muslims, perhaps, but I am yet to be convinced, a majority. Simply by looking at a map of the world and plotting the trouble spots will reveal the truth that is there for everyone to see, but are unable to see because they have been blinded by political correctness.

    The danger with political correctness is its sublety and its pervasiveness. It was political correctness that allowed NAZI Germany to persecute Jews and other “deviants” with little reaction from the general public, having been lulled into a moral swoon by the machinery of politically correct propaganda.

    When I hear and read such rhetoric as “useless” or “dud” teachers and “bludging” public servants being trumpeted in the media I see the beginnings of persecution. What about “whingeing” Pom? Everybody in Australia knows that Poms (English immigrants) are whingers. How do they know that?

    One publisher, whose books I often read, has a series entitled “The Politically Incorrect Guide to (Whatever)” which seeks to unmask and debunk the political correctness that so pervades our society today and threatens our very freedom.

    • Michael G. Says:

      The traffic cones/“witches’ hats” thing just makes me shake my head. It’s so frustrating. It’s absolutely true that “political correctness that so pervades our society today and threatens our very freedom”. Great line!

  3. Don Done Says:

    We have to be careful not to use the phrase, ‘political correctness’ as a blanket description of some bureaucratic decisions which lack common sense. The main issue concerning PC is humane respect for others. When the one showing proper respect is treated like a criminal then there’s a logical, even moral, problem w/ decision-makers.
    However, let’s not confuse the issues here. Would we rather our peers, or even children, be allowed to call others demeaning names w/o any consequences, or would we rather demand our “freedom” to carry ourselves like we so desire no matter who is offended? What policy decision-makers need is to stand up for what they believe about respect and not back down to agenda-driven groups who think they determine teachers’ futures–guess what, they don’t!

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